Best foods rich in magnesium you can eat every day

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

Image credit: www.istockphoto.com/portfolio/bit245

Magnesium is an essential nutrient. This mineral is classified as a micronutrient, yet our body requires it for countless functions to operate normally and maintain optimal health. Some of the primary functions magnesium has in the body include maintaining normal blood glucose levels, optimizing cognitive functions and health, and supporting athletic performance.

Although there are many diets that are lacking in essential minerals, magnesium can be found naturally in many foods. So, if you are looking for a way to boost your magnesium intake, we have compiled a list of the top foods containing a rich source of magnesium that you can eat every day. Read on to learn everything you need to know about the importance of magnesium, foods that are rich in magnesium, when to buy magnesium supplements, and consequences of a magnesium deficiency.

Best Foods Rich in Magnesium You Can Eat Everyday

You have a few food options that provide an excellent source of magnesium, before getting more in-depth about the benefits of taking supplements like the ones you can find on this list from BestInSupplements. For the most part, the amount of magnesium present in a certain food is largely based on the nutrient levels in the soil where the food was growing. Generally speaking, the foods that contain the highest amount of magnesium per serving will be nuts and leafy green vegetables.

When it comes to nutrition verbiage, for a food to be considered an excellent source of a particular nutrient, it must contain more than 20% of the daily recommended value of said nutrient in each serving. For example, the following list of food items are considered an excellent source of magnesium.

  • Spinach: One cup of boiled spinach, which equates to a single serving size, contains approximately 157 mg of magnesium. This is about 44.5% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Pumpkin Seeds: A one ounce serving of roasted pumpkin seeds contains approximately 156 mg of magnesium, which is about 37% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Swiss Chard: Similar to spinach, one cup of boiled Swiss chard (equal to a single serving size) contains approximately 150 mg of magnesium, which is about 42.5% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Brazil Nuts: A one ounce serving of Brazil nuts contains approximately 107 mg of magnesium, which is about 30.5% of the daily value for magnesium.

Now that we know what “excellent source” means in relation to a particular food, let’s discuss what it means for a food to be a “good source.” A food that contains between 10% to 20% of the daily value of a particular nutrient is classified as a “good source.”

For the purposes of this article, when calculating the daily value of magnesium for each food item, we are using 350 mg as this is an easy “in-between” value for men and women. So, which foods fall under the category of a “good source of magnesium”? Read on to find out.

Nuts and Nut Butters That Offer a Rich Source of Magnesium

There are a couple of whole nuts that are both healthy snacks and offer a rich source of magnesium. These include cashews, almonds, and peanuts. If consuming whole, raw nuts isn’t your go-to choice for a snack item, you can also try nut butters made from these almonds, cashews, and peanuts. Let’s start with the nutrient facts of almonds and the health benefits they offer.

  • Almonds and Almond Butter: A one ounce serving of dry roasted almonds contains approximately 79 mg of magnesium, which is about 22.5% of the dail value for magnesium. Similarly, two tablespoons of almond butter, which is the recommended serving size of this food item, contains approximately 89 mg magnesium, which is about 25% of the daily value for magnesium. As one of the most popular snack foods in the nut category, almonds are packed with nutrients, including magnesium. In addition to magnesium, almonds also deliver a rich source of healthy fats. When consumed on a daily basis as part of a balanced diet, a serving size of almonds offers numerous health benefits. Almonds are shown to support a healthy functioning heart, help the body fight inflammation, and promote a healthy immune system. Adding to this, studies have shown us that the consumption of almonds (when incorporated into a healthy diet) may support weight loss efforts.
  • Cashews and Cashew Butter: A one ounce serving of dry roasted cashews contains approximately 74 mg of magnesium, which is about 21% of the daily value for magnesium. Similarly, two tablespoons of cashew butter, which is the recommended serving size of this food item, contains approximately 83 mg magnesium, which is about 23.5% of the daily value for magnesium. Cashews are nutrient-dense nuts with a naturally sweet taste and silky smooth texture. Not only are cashews a rich source of magnesium, but they are also a rich source of other vital nutrients, including calcium, copper, iron, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, and zinc. Similar to magnesium, these nutrients are required by the body to function at its peak level. Cashews, like almonds, are a rich source of beneficial healthy fats. One thing to remember when it comes to incorporating cashews into your nutrient-packed diet, make sure you abide by the recommended serving size, which is equal to approximately one ounce (or a handful for those who don’t want to measure out their foods). Although cashews are inarguably packed with essential nutrients, they are also one of the higher calorie nuts and snack items.
  • Peanuts and Peanut Butter: A one ounce serving of dry roasted peanuts contains approximately 50 mg of magnesium, which is about 14% of the daily value for magnesium. Similarly, two tablespoons of peanut butter, which is the recommended serving size of this food item, contains approximately 54 mg magnesium, which is about 15% of the daily value for magnesium. Peanuts, both as a whole nut snack and as peanut butter, are rich sources of magnesium. This snack food is also relatively inexpensive when compared to the other nuts listed above. In general, peanut butter is the preferred method of consumption. This is good for those who want to boost their magnesium levels as a serving size of peanut butter has a higher amount of the nutrient compared to the whole nut snack item route.

Vegetables That Offer a Rich Source of Magnesium

As we mentioned above, the amount of magnesium found in vegetables (and nuts of course) is largely dependent on the nutrients found in the soil they grow in. Leafy green vegetables are packed with magnesium as this nutrient plays a critical role in plant growth and development. Thus, the leafy greens of vegetables provide an excellent means to boost your daily magnesium levels.

To ensure that you are obtaining the highest level of magnesium from your leafy greens, it is recommended that you boil them first before consumption. Interestingly, preparing your leafy greens this way increases the amount of magnesium you obtain by up to 6 times the regular amount in every serving.

  • Spinach: A single serving, which equals one cup, of boiled spinach contains approximately 157 mg of magnesium, which is about 45% of the daily value for magnesium. When you consume a single serving size (one cup) of raw spinach, you obtain 24 mg of magnesium, which is about 7% of the daily value for magnesium. In addition to being one of the healthiest vegetables you can find, spinach offers a rich source of the essential mineral magnesium, as well as vitamin K. This vitamin is required by the body to perform essential functions such as blood clotting and maintaining healthy and strong bones. What also makes this leafy green vegetable so valuable is its protein content. In a single serving of cooked spinach, you will obtain approximately 5 grams of protein. In a single serving of raw spinach, you will obtain approximately one gram of protein.
  • Swiss Chard: A single serving, which equals one cup, of boiled Swiss chard contains approximately 150 mg of magnesium, which is about 43% of the daily value for magnesium. When you consume a single serving size (one cup) of raw Swiss chard, you obtain 29 mg of magnesium, which is about 8% of the daily value for magnesium. Aside from magnesium, Swiss chard is packed with a number of essential nutrients, including beneficial vitamins, fiber, and antioxidants. The combination of these nutrients in one food can help your body fight cellular damage caused by free radicals. They also support eye and immune system health and function. In addition to the leafy greens we listed above, magnesium is also found in good amounts in potatoes, broccoli, and kale.
  • Potato: One whole baked potato contains approximately 52 mg of magnesium, which is about 15% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Broccoli: A serving size of broccoli, which is one cup of cooked broccoli, contains approximately 33 mg of magnesium, which is about 9% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Kale: One cup of boiled kale, which is designated as a single serving size, contains approximately 30 mg of magnesium, which is about 8.5% of the daily value for magnesium.

Beans That Offer a Rich Source of Magnesium

Although beans may not provide the largest amount of magnesium per serving, they do offer a lot of other beneficia nutrients that are great to have as part of a well-balanced diet.

  • Edamame: In a half cup of edamame, which is the typical serving size, there is approximately 50 mg of magnesium, which is about 14% of the daily value for magnesium. Edamame, which is shelled soybeans, are a great addition to any nutrient-dense diet as they offer a rich source of magnesium, folate, and potassium. Incorporating them into your meals may help you achieve healthy blood pressure, which supports a healthy heart and may reduce the risk of developing heart disease. One of the top qualities that edamame possesses is its protein content. In each serving, which is a half cup of edamame, there is approximately 9 grams of protein. This makes it an ideal source of quality plant-based protein; not to mention the fiber content.
  • Lima Beans: In a half cup serving size of cooked lima beans, there is approximately 63 mg of magnesium, which is about 18% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Black Beans: In a half cup serving of canned black beans, there is approximately 60 mg of magnesium, which is about 17% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Navy Beans: In a half cup serving of cooked navy beans, there is approximately 48 mg of magnesium, which is about 14% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Kidney Beans: In a half cup serving of cooked kidney beans, there is approximately 43 mg of magnesium, which is about 12% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Soymilk: In one cup of unsweetened soymilk, there is approximately 39 mg of magnesium, which is about 11% of the daily value for magnesium.

Seeds and Grains that Offer a Rich Source of Magnesium

It is recommended that you choose grains and cereals that have undergone little to no processing to obtain the highest level of magnesium from these foods (and food groups). When grains are refined, the process removes the part of the grain that contains the highest levels of nutrients; respectively, the bran and germ. As a result, the amount of magnesium you would obtain from these foods is much less. That being said, there are a few refined grains, such as packaged morning cereals, that may be fortified with certain nutrients, including magnesium. Given this, make sure you always read the nutrition label carefully.

  • Pumpkin Seeds: A one ounce serving of roasted pumpkin seeds contains approximately 156 mg of magnesium, which is about 44.5% of the daily value for magnesium. Pumpkin seeds are without a doubt one of the best choices of food for those who are looking to increase their daily intake of magnesium. These tiny seeds make for a great nutritional addition to any salad, trail mix, mixed in with smoothies, or used as a topper on your favorite yogurt or oatmeal.
  • Oatmeal: In a one cup serving of oatmeal, there is approximately 63 mg of magnesium, which is about 18% of the daily value for magnesium. Oatmeal is a great food option for breakfast in the morning as it is nutrient-dense and offers numerous health benefits. Oatmeal is high in fiber, which supports a healthy body mass index and heart health. One of the benefits of eating oatmeal is that you can add whatever topping you like to boost the nutritional content, including berries, nuts, seeds, honey, coconut or almond milk, or nut butters.
  • Quinoa: In a half cup serving of cooked quinoa, there is approximately 59 mg of magnesium, which is about 17% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Flaxseed: In a two tablespoon serving size of ground flaxseed, there is approximately 55 mg of magnesium, which is about 16% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Brown Rice: In a half cup serving of cooked brown rice, there is approximately 43 mg of magnesium, which is about 12% of the daily value for magnesium.

Fruits that Offer a Rich Source of Magnesium

Similar to vegetables, the amount of magnesium found in a particular fruit is highly dependent on the level of nutrients found in the soil the food grows in. Fruits are not only sweet, but they also offer a wide variety of beneficial nutrients that make great additions to a balanced diet. They are a rich source of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and fiber. If you are searching for fruits to boost your daily levels of magnesium, there are two in particular that are rich in this mineral.

  • Dried Figs: In one cup of dried figs, there is approximately 101 mg of magnesium, which is about 29% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Banana: A single serving equals a medium sized banana, which contains approximately 32 mg of magnesium. That is about 9% of the daily value for magnesium. You’ve undoubtedly heard that bananas are a rich source of potassium, which like magnesium, is an important electrolyte. When combined with chocolate milk, bananas are an ideal post-exercise snack that are jam packed with lots of beneficial nutrients.
  • Avocado: A single serving size equals a half of an avocado, which contains approximately 29 mg of magnesium. That is about 8% of the daily value for magnesium. Avocados being classified as a fruit often surprises most people. They are classified as a single-seed berry because they fit all the criteria to be a berry with a fleshy pulp and a seed. Avocados are one of the only fruits that contain healthy unsaturated fats. These fruits are extremely versatile and nutrient-dense. You can use them to make a healthy dip, such as guacamole, or added on top of a salad, grilled chicken sandwich, or toast.
  • Papaya: In a medium size papaya, there is approximately 64 mg of magnesium, which is about 18% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Blackberries: In one cup of blackberries, there is approximately 29 mg of magnesium, which is about 8% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Guava: In a half cup serving size of raw guava, there is approximately 21 mg of magnesium, which is about 6% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Pears: In a medium sized pear, there is approximately 12.5 mg of magnesium, which is about 3.5% of the daily value for magnesium. 

Proteins That Offer a Rich Source of Magnesium

There are not an abundance of protein sources with high levels of magnesium. Actually, most don’t even qualify as “good” sources of magnesium. That being said, when incorporated into a balanced, nutrient-dense diet, the following proteins can help you reach your daily recommended intake of magnesium.

  • Mackerel: In a three ounce serving of cooked mackerel, there is approximately 82 mg of magnesium, which is about 23% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Chicken Breast: In a one cup serving of cooked chicken, there is approximately 35 mg of magnesium, which is about 10% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Salmon: In a three ounce serving of salmon, there is approximately 26 mg of magnesium, which is about 7% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Halibut: In a three ounce serving of halibut, there is approximately 24 mg of magnesium, which is about 6.5% of the daily value for magnesium.
  • Low-Fat Greek Yogurt: In a seven ounce serving of low-fat greek yogurt, there is approximately 22 mg of magnesium, which is about 6% of the daily value for magnesium.

The Importance of Magnesium to Our Health

Most of us know that a balanced, nutrient-dense diet is a vital component to living a healthy lifestyle. Outside of ensuring that we are consuming optimal levels of macronutrients, which are protein, carbohydrates, and fats, there are times when we overlook just how important it is to ensure we are consuming optimal levels of micronutrients.

Macronutrients, which are vitamins and minerals, are equally as important to a well-balanced, nutrient-dense diet as macronutrients. At the top of the list of macronutrients to make sure we have plenty of in our daily dietary regimen is magnesium. Not only is magnesium an essential mineral, which means that the body cannot produce it on its own, but it’s also an important electrolyte.

Magnesium is involved in more than 300 reactions in the body, including:

  • Play a critical role in muscle contraction and relaxation.
  • Help the body absorb and retain other electrolytes.
  • Help regulate blood glucose levels.
  • Plays a critical role in mood balance; supports a healthy mental status.
  • Support metabolic processes involved in cellular energy production.
  • Participate in synthesis of proteins in the body, which supports the development and preservation of lean muscle mass.
  • Support healthy muscle and nerve function.
  • Be involved in the maintenance, function, and health of the immune system.

How Much Magnesium Do I Need On a Daily Basis?

Before we dive into our list of top foods that offer a rich source of magnesium, let’s go over how much magnesium we need on a daily basis. The general recommendation for most healthy individuals, unless otherwise directed by a primary care physician, is dependent on your age and gender.

For women who are 19 years of age and older, the daily recommended intake is 310 mg of magnesium. For women who are pregnant, this amount increases to 350 mg of magnesium daily. For men who are 19 years of age and older, the daily recommended intake is 400 mg of magnesium. After the age of 30, this amount increases to 420 mg of magnesium for men.

These amounts of magnesium, when incorporated as part of a balanced and nutritional diet, are shown to be the optimal level to support health.

Should I Take a Magnesium Supplement?

If you find yourself struggling to boost your magnesium levels, even after incorporating some or all of these nutrient-dense foods into your well-balanced diet, you can find help by taking a high-quality magnesium supplement. Before taking any supplement, always consult with a healthcare professional to make sure that you are healthy enough to take magnesium in supplement form.

Symptoms of a Magnesium Deficiency

Given the availability of food nowadays, plus supplements, making sure that you reach your daily recommended value of magnesium isn’t the most difficult task. That said, there are a number of people who eat a diet that is lacking in this beneficial mineral. A magnesium-deficient diet is very common in westernized diets that are full of processed, packaged, and fast foods. Adding to this, there are a few health conditions that make an individual more susceptible to becoming deficient in magnesium, these include:

  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Celiac Disease
  • Chronic Diarrhea
  • Alcohol Use Disorder
  • Type 2 Diabetes

A person who is deficient in magnesium will usually experience one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Fatigue – Chronic Exhaustion
  • Appetite Loss
  • Vomiting
  • Nausea
  • Generalized and/or Muscle Weakness

When a person becomes chronically deficient in magnesium, they will usually experience one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Heart Arrhythmias
  • Coronary Artery Spasms
  • Numbness and/or Tingling Sensation
  • Muscle Cramps and/or Spasms
  • Changes in Personality and/or Mood
  • Seizures

Final Thoughts on Foods Rich in Magnesium You Can Eat Everyday

Eating a balanced, nutrient-dense diet is one of the best methods to ensure you are achieving your daily recommended amount of magnesium. Now that you have a full list of magnesium-rich foods, you should have no trouble incorporating these food items into your daily dietary regimen to boost your magnesium levels in a natural way. If help is needed, you can find a quality magnesium supplement to boost your levels as well.

First and foremost, it is the general recommendation by most diet and nutrition experts to do your best to obtain all of your daily nutrient needs from dietary sources. Natural forms of nutrients are (usually) the easiest for our body to digest. Even if some of these foods are not exactly appealing to you, there are plenty of ways to incorporate most of them into dishes to create a nutritionally-balanced and tasty meal.

Comments

comments

Share.

Comments are closed.

DISCLAIMER

The content and the information in this website are for informational and educational purposes only, not as a medical manual. All readers are urged to consult with a physician before beginning or discontinuing use of any prescription drug or under taking any form of self-treatment. The information given here is designed to help you make informed decisions about your health. It is not intended as a substitute for any treatment that may have been prescribed by your doctor. If you are under treatment for any health problem, you should check with your doctor before trying any home remedies. If you are following any medication, take any herb, mineral, vitamin or other supplement only after consulting with your doctor. If you suspect that you have a medical problem, we urge you to seek competent medical help. The Health Benefits Times writers, publishers, authors, its representatives disclaim liability for any unfavorable effects causing directly or indirectly from articles and materials contained in this website www.healthbenefitstimes.com