Facts about Pale poppy

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Pale poppy Quick Facts
Name: Pale poppy
Scientific Name: Papaver argemone
Origin Temperate regions of North Africa, Europe and Western Asia including Macaronesia, Canary Islands, Algeria, Egypt and Morocco
Shapes Oblong-obovoid to club-shaped seed capsules about 1.5-2 cm long
Papaver argemone commonly known as Pale poppy is a species of flowering plant in the poppy family Papaveraceae. The plant is native to temperate regions of North Africa, Europe and Western Asia including Macaronesia, Canary Islands, Algeria, Egypt and Morocco. Within Western Asia it is found in the Caucasus, Armenia, Cyprus, Egypt (in the Sinai), Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria and Turkey. In Eastern Europe, it is found within Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova and Ukraine. In middle Europe, it is in Austria, Belgium, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia and Switzerland.  It has been introduced into the American states of Idaho, Oregon, Pennsylvania and Utah. It is cultivated as an ornamental plant. Its common names include long pricklyhead poppy, prickly poppy and pale poppy. It is commonly known as Long prickly-headed poppy, Pale poppy, Prickly poppy, Sand poppy, Long-Headed Bristly Poppy, Pale rough fruit poppy and Pinnate poppy. It is known as Sand-Mohn in German, spikvallmo in Swedish, and amapola macho in Spanish.

Pale Poppy Facts

Name Pale poppy
Scientific Name Papaver argemone
Native Central and Western Europe, Mediterranean, Ukraine, Southern Scandinavia. It can also be found growing wild in parts of North America, where it is an introduced species
Common Names Long prickly-headed poppy, Pale poppy, Prickly poppy, Sand poppy, Long-Headed Bristly Poppy, Pale rough fruit poppy, Pinnate poppy
Name in Other Languages Albanian: Sygjarpëri
Arabic: خشخاش أرجموني
Basque: Orburuiska
Belarusian: Mak argemona (Мак аргемона)
Catalan: Rosella de flor petita
Croatian: Pješčarski mak              
Czech: Mák polní
Danish: Kølle-Valmue, Køllevalmue
Dutch: Ruige klaproos, Stekelpapaver
Estonian: Liivmagun
Finnish: Hietaunikko, Hietonikko
English: Long prickly-headed poppy, Pale poppy, Prickly poppy, Sand poppy, Long-Headed Bristly Poppy, Pale rough fruit poppy, Pinnate poppy
Estonian: Liivmagun
Finnish: Hietaunikko
French : Pavot argémone, Pavot-coq, Pavot rude, Coquelicot argémone, poinceau
German : Sandmohn, Sand-Mohn
Greek: Trichotí paparoúna (τριχωτή παπαρούνα)
Hebrew: Parag mo’orach, פָּרָג מָאֳרָךְ         
Hungarian: Ordögmák  
Ingush: Aling argemone (Алинг аргемона)
Italian: Papavero selvatico, Papavero spinoso, argemona, papavero argemone, papavero peloso, papavero smilzo
Kazakh: Apïın köknäri (Апиын көкнәрі)
Latvian: Sarainā magone              
Lithuanian: Smiltyninė aguona
Lower Sorbian: Pěskowy mak
Norwegian: Klubbevalmue, Klubbevallmue
Persian: خشخاش بیابانی
Polish : Mak piaskowy
Portuguese: Papoila-longa-peluda.
Quechua: K’ita p’akincha
Russian: Mak argemona (Мак аргемона), mak argemone (мак аргемоне), mak argemonovyy (мак аргемоновый), mak kolyuchyy  (мак колючий), mak polevoy (мак полевой)                             
Slovak: Mak poľný
Slovene: Peščeni mak   
Spanish: Amapola espinosa, Amapola macho, Rosella de flor petit, Amapola, amapola de flor pequeña,
Swedish: Spikvallmoe, Spikvallmo, Hietaunikko
Turkish: Kum haşhaşı    
Ukrainian: mak piskovyy (мак пісковий), mak polʹovyy (мак польовий)
Upper Sorbian: Mały mak
Welsh: Drewg Hirben Gwrychog, Pabi Bychan, Pabi Gwrychog, Pabi Hirben Gwrychog, Pabi Penwrychog
Plant Growth Habit An annual or biennial herb
Growing Climates Fields and disturbed soils (including ploughed), mesic to dry waste places
Soil Prefers a well-drained sandy loam in a sunny position. Does not do well on wet clay soils but succeeds in most other soils. Plants usually self-sow freely when growing in suitable conditions so long as the soil surface is disturbed
Plant Size 10–50 cm tall
Stem Stems ascending to erect, simple or more usually branched, stiff-hairy
Leaf Basal leaves are numerous, oblanceolate, divided into 2-3 pairs of primary lateral lobes which are again divided, long-stalked, stiff-hairy, 8-15 cm long. Stem leaves are similar, not much reduced above.
Flowering season May and July
Flower The flowers have four slightly overlapping red petals, each with a dark base. They can measure 2–5.5 cm (0.79–2.17 in) across, with pale blue anthers and 4-6 stigmas
Fruit Shape & Size Oblong-obovoid to club-shaped seed capsules about 1.5-2 cm long
Season oblong-obovoid to club-shaped seed capsules about 1.5-2 cm long

Plant Description

Pale poppy is an annual or biennial herb that normally grows about 10–50 cm tall. The plant is found growing in fields and disturbed soils (including ploughed), mesic to dry waste places. The plant prefers a well-drained sandy loam in a sunny position. It does not do well on wet clay soils but succeeds in most other soils. Plants usually self-sow freely when growing in suitable conditions so long as the soil surface is disturbed. Its 15–50 cm (5.9–19.7 in) long, branching stems are ascending to erect, simple or more usually branched and are coated in stiff prickly hairs.

Leaves

Basal leaves are numerous, oblanceolate, divided into 2-3 pairs of primary lateral lobes which are again divided, long-stalked, stiff-hairy, 8-15 cm long. Stem leaves are similar, not much reduced above.

Flowers

Inflorescence of solitary, terminal, erect flowers and buds nodding. Flower stalks are stiff-hairy. The flowers have four slightly overlapping red petals, each with a dark base. They can measure 2–5.5 cm (0.79–2.17 in) across, with pale blue anthers and 4-6 stigmas. Flowering normally takes place in spring to summer, between May and July.

Fruits

Fertile flowers are followed by oblong-obovoid to club-shaped seed capsules about 1.5-2 cm long. They are prominently ribbed, covered with stiff bristles.

Traditional uses and benefits of Pale Poppy

  • An infusion or syrup made from the petals is used as a sudorific.
  • In the past, the pale poppy was used in herbal medicines.

Other Facts

  • The petal of the poppy was once used in folklore, as a test of faithfulness.
  • A petal was placed in the palm of the loved ones hand and if when stuck with a fist and produced a snapping sound, the loved one was true.

Precautions

  • This plant is toxic to mammals, though the toxicity is low.
  • The seed is not toxic.

References:

https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=504109#null

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Papaver+argemone

https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/116109

http://www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-0000480350

https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/PAPAR

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papaver_argemone

https://plants.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=PAAR3

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