Facts about Yellow Fieldcress

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Yellow fieldcress Quick Facts
Name: Yellow fieldcress
Scientific Name: Rorippa sylvestris
Origin Native to Europe and Asia and now widely established throughout North America
Colors Initially green turning to brown as they mature
Shapes Many seeded, linear, slender silique up to ½ inch (10 to 15 mm) long on a slender pedicel about 1/3 inches (8 mm.) long
Taste Peppery taste
Rorippa sylvestris commonly known as the creeping yellowcress, keek, or yellow fieldcress is an invasive species of plant belonging to Brassicaceae / Cruciferae (Mustard family) and is one of the three perennials in the genus. The plant is native to Europe and Asia and now widely established throughout North America. This mustard has been located in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Montana in the northwestern U.S. however sites have been located as far south as Texas, Alabama and Mississippi as of 1966. It is also found in nurseries in eastern Canada, but has been recorded in all of the southern provinces. Most recently it has been found in two locations in California. Some of the popular common names of the plants are Creeping yellow cress, Creeping yellow field cress, Yellow field cress and keek.

Yellow Fieldcress Facts

Name Yellow fieldcress
Scientific Name Rorippa sylvestris
Native Native to Europe and Asia and now widely established throughout North America
Common Names Creeping yellow cress, Creeping yellow field cress, Yellow field cress, keek
Name in Other Languages Afrikaans: Keek
Albanian: Roripa e pyllit, roripë, Keek
Amharic: Kēki (ኬክ)
Arabic: Kayk (كيك)
Armenian: Kek (կէկ)
Azerbaijani: Qəşəng
Belarusian: Žarušnik liasny  (Жарушнік лясны)
Bengali: Curi karē dēkhā (চুরি করে দেখা)
Bulgarian: Gorski porech (горски пореч), nadzŭrtam (надзъртам)
Burmese: Kyinnar (ကြင်နာ)
Catalan: Creixen silvestre            
Chinese:  Ou ya han cai, Ōu yà tíng lì (歐亞葶藶), Jí kè (極客), Goku kyaku
Croatian: Sumski grbak, špijunirati
Czech: Rukev obecná, rukev lesní, pokukovat    
Danish: Vej-guldkarse, Keek, Rund løg, Rævehale-amarant, Top-amarant, Vej-guldkarse
Dutch: Akkerkers, keek
English: Creeping yellow cress, Creeping yellow field cress, Yellow field cress, keek
Esperanto: Fervora
Estonian: Metskerss, keek
Filipino: Keek
Finnish: Rantanenätti, Rikkanenätti, кikkanenätti, keek
French: Cresson des bois, Cresson sauvage, Rorippe sylvestre, Rorippe des forêts, rorippe des champs, caquette sauvage, cresson des forêts, cresson sauvage, cresson sauvage, herbe à l’empereur, roquette sauvage, rorippe des forêts, keek
Georgian: Keik’I (ქეიკი)
German: Wald-Sumpfkresse, Wilde-Sumpfkresse, Waldkresse, wilde Kresse, keek
Greek: Róripa dasikí (ρόριπα δασική),  entáxei (εντάξει)
Gujarati: Kīka (કીક)
Hausa: Keek
Hebrew: בקי
Hungarian: Erdei kányafű, ishkap kányafű, kukucskál                     
Icelandic: Flækjujurt, keek
Indonesian: Mengintai
Irish: Biolar buí reatha, keek      
Italian: Crescione radicina, crescione di fiume, nasturzio
Japanese:  Kireha inu garashi (キレハイヌガラシ), kirenoinuka rashi (キレノイヌカ ラシ), yachiinugarashi, Kīku (キーク)
Javanese: Keek
Kannada: Kīk (ಕೀಕ್)
Kazakh: Kek (кек)
Korean: Deul-yeoda boda (들여다 보다)
Kurdish: Keek
Lao: Keek
Latin: Keek
Latvian: Meža paķērsa, keksis   
Lithuanian: Miškinis čeriukas, keek
Macedonian: Keek (кеек)
Malagasy: Keek
Malay: Keek
Malayalam: Kīkk (കീക്ക്)
Maltese: Akkan
Marathi: Keek (कीक)
Mongolian: Khachin (хачин)
Nepali: Keek
Netherlands: Akkerkers
Norwegian: Vegkarse, keek, Skou-sennep, Veikarse
Northern Sami: Gáddekrássa
Occitan: Escarrabilhe, nasitort salvatge 
Oriya: Keek
Pashto  کیک
Persian: ترتیزک زرد جنگلی
Polish: Rzepicha leśna, Keek
Portuguese: Agrião Silvestre, agrião-amarelo, agrião-rastejante, keek
Punjabi: Keek
Romanian: Keek
Russian: Zherushnik lesnoy (Жерушник лесной),            -podglyadyvat (подглядывать)
Serbian: Zutenica (жутеница), žuti ugaz (жути угаз), obični grbak (обични грбак), keek (кеек)
Sinhala: Keek   
Slovak: Roripa lesná
Slovene: Divja potočarka, gozdna potočarka, keek
Spanish: Oruga palustre, roqueta palustre, romper a
Sundanese: Keek
Swedish: Strandfräne, keek, Grönamarant, Kirgislök, Rundlök, Rävsvans, Segerlök, Rikkanenätti, Trädgårdsgräslök, Strandkrasse, Strandsenap
Tajik: Gurext (гурехт)
Tamil: Kīk (கீக்)
Telugu: Keek
Thai: Mxng lxd (มองลอด)
Turkish: Cakandura, gizlice bırakıvermek              
Ukrainian: Vodyanyy khrin lisovyy (Водяний хрін лісовий), kik (кик)
Urdu: کیک
Uzbek: Qip-qizil
Vietnamese: Keek
Welsh: Berwr melyn ymlusgol, berwr melyn ymlysgil y dwr, keek, Berwr Melyn Blynyddol y Dŵr, Berwr Melyn Ymlusgol, Berwr Melyn Ymlusgol y Dŵr, Berwy Melyn Ymlusgol y Dwfr, Berwyr Melyn Blynyddol y Dŵr
Zulu:  Keek
Plant Growth Habit Perennial herbaceous plant
Growing Climates Disturbed wetlands, muddy or grassy borders of ditches, soggy meadows, floodplain areas, poorly drained areas along railroads, waste places, nurseries, along streams, near cultivated fields, wet lands, along ditches, damp areas, plains, valleys, sandy beaches, gardens, flower beds, park lawns and roadside embankments
Soil Preference is full sunlight, wet to moist conditions, and a mucky soil with abundant organic matter. Temporary flooding is tolerated, although more or less permanent standing water is not. This plant withstands occasional mowing
Plant Size 20–50 cm (8–20 in.) tall
Root Root system produces abundant rhizomes and vegetative offsets of the mother plant; sometimes a prostrate lower stem will form rootlets near the leaf axils on moist ground. This plant often forms colonies
Stem Creeping, ascending branches, glossy or with a few sparse hairs
Leaf Basal and lower stem leaves are glabrous, pinnately lobed, and oblong-ovate or lanceolate-ovate in outline. The terminal lobe is often broader than the other lobes. They are up to 8 inches (to 20 cm) long and ¾ inch wide, deeply divided into lobes that may be further lobed or have coarsely toothed edges
Flowering season October to March
Flower Each flower is about 1/3 inches (8 mm.) across when fully open, consisting of 4 yellow petals 3 to 5 mm long, rounded, spatula shaped, and 4 yellow green sepals. Stamens are 6, erect, 4 larger and 2 smaller. Filaments are yellow, glabrous, to 3mm long.
Fruit Shape & Size Many seeded, linear, slender silique up to ½ inch (10 to 15 mm) long on a slender pedicel about 1/3 inches (8 mm.) long
Fruit Color Initially green turning to brown as they mature
Seed Seeds (rarely produced), usually uniseriate, rarely sub-biseriate, reddish brown, ovoid, 0.5-0.9 mm (0.4-0.5 mm diam.), colliculate
Taste Peppery taste
Propagation By seed and vegetatively by rhizomes
Season November to March
Culinary Uses
  • The seeds of various types of field cresses (genus Lepidium) have been used as a flavoring for meat, salads, and soups.

Plant Description

Yellow fieldcress is a perennial herbaceous plant that normally grows about 20–50 cm (8–20 in.) tall. The plant is found growing in disturbed wetlands, muddy or grassy borders of ditches, soggy meadows, floodplain areas, poorly drained areas along railroads, waste places, nurseries, along streams, near cultivated fields, wet lands, along ditches, damp areas, plains, valleys, sandy beaches, gardens, flower beds, park lawns and roadside embankments. The plant prefers full sunlight, wet to moist conditions, and a mucky soil with abundant organic matter. Temporary flooding is tolerated, although more or less permanent standing water is not. This plant can also withstand occasional mowing. Root system produces abundant rhizomes and vegetative offsets of the mother plant; sometimes a prostrate lower stem will form rootlets near the leaf axils on moist ground. This plant often forms colonies.

Stem

Stems are erect to ascending to prostrate, usually branched, ribbed, hairless or with sparse hairs on the lower stem. The lower stem of this plant has a tendency to sprawl along the ground in the absence of supportive vegetative; otherwise it is more or less erect. Both the lower and upper stems are glabrous, angular, and somewhat succulent. Plants can form dense colonies from creeping, underground stems (rhizomes).

Leaves

Young plants form basal rosettes that disappear after the first year. Basal and lower stem leaves are glabrous, pinnately lobed, and oblong-ovate or lanceolate-ovate in outline. The terminal lobe is often broader than the other lobes. They are up to 8 inches (to 20 cm) long and ¾ inch wide, deeply divided into lobes that may be further lobed or have coarsely toothed edges. Leaves are hairless and become smaller and the divisions narrower as they ascend the stem. The margins of the leaves are bluntly dentate, shallowly lobed, or undulate.

Flower

The upper stems terminate in racemes of yellow flowers. These flowers bloom near the apex of the raceme, while the siliques on spreading pedicels develop below. Each flower is about 1/3 inches (8 mm.) across when fully open, consisting of 4 yellow petals 3 to 5 mm long, rounded, spatula shaped, and 4 yellow green sepals. Stamens are 6, erect, 4 larger and 2 smaller. Filaments are yellow, glabrous, to 3mm long. Anthers yellow, 1mm long. Ovary is cylindrical, green-yellow, glabrous, 2mm long in flower, superior. The blooming period occurs from early to mid-summer and lasts about 1½ months.

Fruit

Each fertile flowers are replaced by many seeded, linear, slender silique up to ½ inch (10 to 15 mm) long on a slender pedicel about 1/3 inches (8 mm.) long. Each silique is straight or slightly curved, terminating in a short beak. Fruits are initially green turning to brown as they mature. Fruit consists of several tiny seeds that can probably float on water or blow about in the wind.

Other Facts

  • Seed is produced 2 to 3 times per year
  • Plants spread by growing additional shoots from the crown or from the roots.
  • Creeping field cress has the potential to become a serious weed in greenhouse, container and field ornamentals.
  • It has been confirmed in container and greenhouse crops in California in 1998.
  • Seed-eating pet birds such as canaries also relish the seeds.
  • Other historic uses include various medicinal applications, with varying degrees of effectiveness.

References:

https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=23017#null

https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/RORSY

http://www.misin.msu.edu/facts/detail/?project=&id=433&cname=Creeping%20yellowcress

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-2417195

https://gobotany.nativeplanttrust.org/species/rorippa/sylvestris/

https://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Yellow%20Fieldcress.html

https://indiabiodiversity.org/species/show/245824

http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200009673

https://www.nzpcn.org.nz/flora/species/rorippa-sylvestris/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rorippa_sylvestris

http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=200009673

https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/flower/creeping-yellow-cress

https://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/weeds/plants/creeping_cress.htm

https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/47792

https://plants.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=ROSY

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