Facts about Yellow Peas

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

Yellow Pea Quick Facts
Name: Yellow Pea
Scientific Name: Lathyrus aphaca
Origin Western and Southern Europe, southern part of Central Europe, northern parts of Africa as well as in South-Western and Central Asia
Colors Initially green turning to dull greenish or brownish as they mature
Shapes Straight or incurved glabrous legumes that are 2- 4 cm long and 3-5 mm wide with 6-8 seeds.
Taste Sweet, slightly nutty, and grassy flavor
Lathyrus aphaca, commonly known as the yellow pea or yellow vetchling, is an annual species in the Fabaceae / Leguminosae (Pea family). The plant mostly occurs in Western and Southern Europe, southern part of Central Europe, northern parts of Africa as well as in South-Western and Central Asia and introduced in North America, where it has scattered occurrences, mainly in the south and the west. In New England it has been collected only in Massachusetts. Apart from yellow pea it is also known as Yellow vetchling, Yellow pea, Yellow Vetch, Yellow peavine and Yellow-Flowered Pea.

Genus name Lathyrus is the ancient name for chickling pea. The species name is used by Pliny for the lentil like plant. Some consider it to be a weed, particularly when in areas where it is an introduced species, including northern Europe and North America. It acclimates best to dry places, such as sand, gravel, and chalk, and requires a well-drained habitat. Normally the plant is harvested from the wild for local use as a food, medicine and dyestuff.

Yellow Pea Facts

Name Yellow Pea
Scientific Name Lathyrus aphaca
Native Mostly occurs in Western and Southern Europe, southern part of Central Europe, northern parts of Africa as well as in South-Western and Central Asia and introduced in North America, where it has scattered occurrences, mainly in the south and the west. In New England it has been collected only in Massachusetts
Common Names Yellow vetchling, Yellow pea, Yellow Vetch, Yellow peavine, Yellow-Flowered Pea
Name in Other Languages Albanian: Sygjarpëri, vingjër
Arabic: Bîqîyah, Hhamâm el burg, jalban eafqa (جلبان عفقة)
Assamese: Bon-motor
Basque: Astailarra, Astailar         
Bulgarian: bezlichno sekirche (безлично секирче), kopielistno sekirche (копиелистно секирче), zhŭlto sekirche (жълто секирче)
Catalan: Gerdell, Banya de cabra, Fesolet, Galavars menut, Inflabou, Tapissot bord
Croatian: Vitičasta kukavičica     
Czech: Hrachor bezlistý, Hrachor pa, hrachor pačočkový
Danish: Bladløs fladbælg
Dutch: Naakte lathyrus
English: Yellow vetchling, Yellow pea, Yellow Vetch, Yellow peavine, Yellow-Flowered Pea
Finnish: Korvakenätkelmä
French: Gesse aphaca, Gesse sans feuille, Gesse Aphylle, Gesse sans feuilles, pois de serpent
German: Rankenplatterbse, Ranken Platterbse, nackte Platterbse,
Hebrew: Tofach matzui, טֹפַח מָצוּי                            
Hindi: Jangli Matter (जंगली मटर), Janglimatar, Pili Matter
Hungarian: Levéltelen lednek   
Italian: Afaga, Cicerchia senza foglie, Melagra, Pitine, Veccia bastarda, cicerchia bastarda, fior galletto, latiro afaga, majorella, mullaghera, vetriolo, Afaca
Irish: Peasairín garraí     
Japanese: Takuyô-renri-sôu (タクヨウレンリソウ)
Kabyle: Aḥbac n wezrem
Kannada: Chkka thogari               
Latvian: Vītņu dedestiņa
Macedonian: Bezlisten graor (безлистен граор)
Nepali: Ban khesari (बन खेसरी)
Occitan: Bésse, cese de loup, cése, guirgàlh, jerderic, jerjerèt
Oriya: ମଟର
Persian: خلر بی‌برگ
Portuguese: Chícharo-amarelo, Ervilha-olho-de-boneca, ervilhaca-silvestre
Romanian: Linte galbenă             
Russian: China Bezlistochkovaya (чина безлисточковая)             
Serbian: bezlisni grahor (безлисни грахор), nokata (ноката), obični grahor (обични грахор), sjajnik (сјајник)
Slovak: Hrachor bezlistý               
Slovene: Lečasti grahor                                                                                                        Spanish: Afaca, Alverja Silvestre, afaga, alverja amarilla, alverja de burros, arvejo, arvexaca
Swedish: Spjutvial, Pjutvial
Turkish: Sar burçak, Sarı mürdümük
Ukrainian: Cina bezlistočkova (чина безлисточкова)     
Upper Sorbian: Wobwitkowy hróšik
Welsh: Ydbysen Felen, Ytbys Melyn, Ytbysen Felen
Plant Growth Habit Medium to tall, slender trailing or scrambling, hairless annual plant
Growing Climates Dry places on sand, gravel and chalk, man-made or disturbed habitats, cultivated fields, roadsides, dry lawns, transport route edges (especially along railway lines), in orchards, arable fields, fallows, waste lots, meadows, rocky limestone slopes, stream banks, marshy ground, disturbed steppe and gravel quarries. It is found mainly as a weed among crops and in gardens, rarely among shrubs and on  herbaceous slopes
Plant Size About 100 cm tall
Stem Stems are pale green to glaucous, glabrous, angled in cross-section but lack wings
Leaf True Leaves are absent. The seedling leaves have a pair of small leaflets, light-green to grey-green colored; the mature leaf is reduced to a simple, unbranched tendril. Stipules are 6-50 mm long and 5-40 mm wide, ovate-hastate to arrowhead in shape with two triangular lobes pointed outwards
Flowering season June to August
Flower Bisexual flowers are usually solitary (occasionally in pairs) and are lemon-yellow in color (often streaked with violet), measuring from 10–13 mm in length, and held on long (up to 50 mm) stalks branching from the leaf axils
Fruit Shape & Size Straight or incurved glabrous legumes that are 2- 4 cm long and 3-5 mm wide with 6-8 seeds
Fruit Color Initially green turning to dull greenish or brownish as they mature
Taste Sweet, slightly nutty, and grassy flavor
Propagation By seed in early summer or early autumn and Division in spring
Culinary Uses
  • The fruits are eaten as a supplement to diets in some parts of South Asia.
Season August to September

Plant Description

Yellow Pea is a medium to tall, slender, trailing or scrambling, hairless annual plant that normally grows about 100 cm tall. The plant grows from a thin rootstock; it produces one to a few erect stems that often cling to surrounding vegetation by means of tendrils. The stems are pale green to glaucous, glabrous, angled in cross-section but lack wings. The plant is found growing in dry places on sand, gravel and chalk, man-made or disturbed habitats, cultivated fields, roadsides, dry lawns, transport route edges (especially along railway lines), in orchards, arable fields, fallows, waste lots, meadows, rocky limestone slopes, stream banks, marshy ground, disturbed steppe and gravel quarries. It is found mainly as a weed among crops and in gardens, rarely among shrubs and on herbaceous slopes.

Leaves

True Leaves are absent. The seedling leaves have a pair of small leaflets, light-green to grey-green colored; the mature leaf is reduced to a simple, unbranched tendril. Stipules are 6-50 mm long and 5-40 mm wide, ovate-hastate to arrowhead in shape with two triangular lobes pointed outwards. The stems and stipules are glabrous and unbranched, prehensile tendrils extend beyond the stipules from the axils.

Flowers

The bisexual flowers are usually solitary (occasionally in pairs) and are lemon-yellow in color (often streaked with violet), measuring from 10–13 mm in length, and held on long (up to 50 mm) stalks branching from the leaf axils. The banner is about 1.5 times as long as the calyx. The wings and keel are roughly equal in length to the banner. The calyx measures 7-10 mm long with linear to narrowly oblong-lanceolate teeth about twice as long as the calyx tube. The flowers, which are, have 10 stamens and 1 style. Flowering normally takes place in between June to August. Flowers are diploid, with 14 chromosomes.

Fruit

Fertile flowers are followed by straight or incurved glabrous legumes that are 2- 4 cm long and 3-5 mm wide with 6-8 seeds. Fruits are initially green turning to dull greenish or brownish as they mature. Seeds are ellipsoid to globose, usually flattish with a glossy, smooth, dark purple-brown to black surface, sometimes spotted to marbled. The fruits are eaten as a supplement to diets in some parts of South Asia but seed contains a toxic amino-acid in large quantities, which can cause a very serious disease of the nervous system known as ‘lathyrism’. When taken in small quantities it is stated that the seeds are safe and highly nutritious.

Some Traditional uses

  • The ripe seeds are said to be antibacterial and narcotic.
  • They are used in the treatment of toothache.
  • The plant is known to contain flavonoids, tannins, glycosides, alkaloids and terpenoids.
  • The flowers are resolvent.

Other Facts

  • The seed is said to be perfectly safe and very nutritious in small quantities.
  • The fruits are eaten as a supplement to diets in some parts of South Asia but are narcotic and potentially toxic in large quantities.
  • It can be an aggressive agricultural weed, infesting mainly wheat, but also other crops, such as sugarcane in Pakistan.
  • Black dye is obtained from the plant when iron is used as the mordant.
  • Plant is cultivated for human consumption in Asia and Mediterranean.
  • It is a problematic weed in the rice-wheat cropping system of Pakistan.
  • Its germination occurs from October-November to April and reaches maturity before wheat crops during early April.
  • It drops its seeds in field before wheat harvest thus increasing the soil weed seed bank and provoking the trouble in subsequent crop of winter season.
  • Various environmental factors such as moisture stress, light, temperature, soil acidity, salinity, pH and depth of seeds burial directly or indirectly affect weeds seeds germination.

Precautions

  • The seed contains a toxic amino-acid which, in large quantities, can cause a very serious disease of the nervous system known as ‘lathyrism’.
  • Some of the common side effects are paralysis of the muscles below the knees, pains in the back, followed by weakness and stiffness of the legs and progressive locomotive incoordination.

References:

https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=25838#null

https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxon/taxonomydetail?id=21544

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lathyrus+aphaca

https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/115145

https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/LTHAP

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lathyrus_aphaca

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/ild-7745

https://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Yellow%20Pea.html

https://www2.dijon.inrae.fr/hyppa/hyppa-a/lthap_ah.htm

https://tennessee-kentucky.plantatlas.usf.edu/plant.aspx?id=3556

https://temperate.theferns.info/plant/Lathyrus+aphaca

http://ibuflora.ibu.edu.tr/en/species/lathyrus-aphaca

https://plants.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=LAAP2

80%
80%
Awesome

Comments

comments

Share.

Comments are closed.

DISCLAIMER

The content and the information in this website are for informational and educational purposes only, not as a medical manual. All readers are urged to consult with a physician before beginning or discontinuing use of any prescription drug or under taking any form of self-treatment. The information given here is designed to help you make informed decisions about your health. It is not intended as a substitute for any treatment that may have been prescribed by your doctor. If you are under treatment for any health problem, you should check with your doctor before trying any home remedies. If you are following any medication, take any herb, mineral, vitamin or other supplement only after consulting with your doctor. If you suspect that you have a medical problem, we urge you to seek competent medical help. The Health Benefits Times writers, publishers, authors, its representatives disclaim liability for any unfavorable effects causing directly or indirectly from articles and materials contained in this website www.healthbenefitstimes.com