Facts about Blue lupin

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

Blue lupin Quick Facts
Name: Blue lupin
Scientific Name: Lupinus angustifolius
Origin Northern Africa, southern Europe and western Asia.
Colors Initially green turning to brown as they mature
Shapes Oblong, slightly inflated pods that are 35–50 mm long and 7–10 mm wide.
Lupinus angustifolius is a species of lupin known by many common names, including narrowleaf lupin, and blue lupin. It is a fast growing annual herb belonging to Fabaceae Lindl. (Pea family). The plant is native to northern Africa (i.e. Algeria, Egypt and Morocco), southern Europe (i.e. Bulgaria, Greece, Italy, France, Portugal and Spain) and western Asia. It is widely naturalized in southern and eastern Australia (i.e. in eastern New South Wales, in some parts of Victoria, in Tasmania and in south-western Western Australia). Also present in some parts of western New South Wales and sparingly naturalized in south-eastern Queensland.

Apart from blue Lupin it is also known as Australian lupin, Australian sweet lupin, bitter lupin, blue lupin, blue lupine, European blue lupine, lupin, narrow leaf lupin, narrow leafed lupin, narrow leaved lupin, narrow-leaf lupin, narrowleaf lupin, narrowleaf lupine, narrow-leafed lupin, narrow-leaved blue lupin, narrow-leaved lupin, New Zealand blue lupin, sweet lupinseed, Altramuz azul and foxtail lupin.  Blue lupin has been cultivated for over 6000 years for use as human food (a pulse), animal fodder and forage, for green manure and as a soil improver and stabilizer. It is also planted as honey flora and seeds are used as a protein additive in animal feed. In many places it is an agricultural and environmental weed.

Blue Lipin Facts

Name Blue Lupin
Scientific Name Lupinus angustifolius
Native Northern Africa (i.e. Algeria, Egypt and Morocco), southern Europe (i.e. Bulgaria, Greece, Italy, France, Portugal and Spain) and western Asia.
Common Names Australian lupin, Australian sweet lupin, bitter lupin, blue lupin, blue lupine, European blue lupine, lupin, narrow leaf lupin, narrow leafed lupin, narrow leaved lupin, narrow-leaf lupin, narrowleaf lupin, narrowleaf lupine, narrow-leafed lupin, narrow-leaved blue lupin, narrow-leaved lupin, New Zealand blue lupin, sweet lupinseed, Altramuz azul, foxtail lupin
Name in Other Languages Afrikaans: Bloulupien
Albanian: Lupini i kaltër
Arabic: Turmus shaytânî, tarmis diq al’awraq (ترمس ضيق الأوراق)
Azerbaijani: Ensizyarpaq acıpaxla
Belarusian: Lubin vuzkalisty (Лубін вузкалісты)
Bulgarian: Lubin vuzkalisty (теснолистна лупина), tyasnolistna lupina (тяснолистна лупина)
Catalan: Llobí bord
Chinese:  Zhai ye yu shan dou, Xia ye yu shan dou (狭叶羽扇豆)
Croatian: Vučika uzkolistna
Czech: Lupina úzkolistá, vlčí bob úzkolistý , Vlčí Bob Úzkolistý, lupina úzkolistá
Danish: Småbladet lupin, Smalbladet lupin
Dominican Republic: Yuca
Dutch: Blauwe lupine
English: Blue lupine, Blue lupin, Narrow leaf lupin, Narrow-leaved lupin, New Zealand blue lupin, European blue lupine, Altramuz azul, Sweet lupinseed, foxtail lupin,  Narrow leaf lupine
Estonian: Ahtalehine lupiin
Finnish: Sinilupiini
French: Lupin bleu, Lupin petit bleu, Lupin à feuilles ètroites, Lupin à folioles étroites, lupin réticulé
German: Blaue Lupine, Bitterlupine, Schmalblättrige Lupine, schmalblättrige Wolfsbohne
Greek: Loúpino (λούπινο)
Hebrew: Turmus tzar-‘alim, trmus tsr-elim (תֻּרְמוּס צַר-עָלִים)
Hungarian: Kék csillagfürt, Keskenylevelü csillagfürt, Kék Csillafürt
Icelandic: Lensulúpína
Italian: Lupino azzurro, Lupino selvatico, lupino a fogliole strette, lupino azzurro, lupino selvatico
Jamaica: Lupin
Japanese: Ao bana ruupin
Korean: Bul ru ru p’in, Ka neun ip mi seon kong, ga neun ip mi seon kong, ganeun-ipmiseonkong (가는잎미선콩)
Latvian: Šaurlapu lupine
Navajo: Azeediilchʼílii
Netherlands: Blauwe lupine
Norwegian: Smallupin
Polish: Lubin waskolistny
Portuguese: Tremoceiro azul, Tremoceiro de folha estreita, Tremoçao bravo, Tremoço amargo, Tremoço des folhas estreitas, Tremoço-azul, tremoceiro-bravo
Russian: Ljupin uzkolistnyj, lupin uzkolistnyy (лупин узколистный)
Slovak: Lupina úzkolistá, vlčí bôb úzkolistý
Spanish: Altramuz azul, Altramuz amargo, Lupino azul, lupino australiano, alberjón, altramuz de hoja estrecha, haba de lagarto, haba loca, titones
Swedish: Blålupin, Fingerlupin, Smallupin
Turkish: Mavi aci bakla, Yabani turmus, acıbakla
Ukrainian: Lyupyn vuzʹkolystyy (люпин вузьколистий)
Upper Sorbian: Wulkołopjenata lupina
Welsh: Bysedd-y-Blaidd Culddail
Other: Modra lupina, Ozkolistna
Plant Growth Habit Erect, annual, deeply tap rooted, fast growing, robust, much-branched, annual herb
Growing Climates Disturbed sites, wastelands, roadsides, sandy coastal habitats, open woodlands, degraded shrub lands, abandoned fields, shrub steppes, parks, gardens, cultivated and rocky ground, secondary forests, ruderal areas, fields, gardens, harbors, meadows, in bushes and near reservoirs
Soil Does well on low to moderately fertile, well-drained, light or medium textured, and mildly acidic to neutral sands and sandy loams. It does not withstand waterlogged soils but has tolerance of transient waterlogging
Plant Size Mostly 50 cm high or less
Root Roots reaching a depth of 2.5 m.
Stem Robust and hairy, with profuse lateral branching
In Leaf April to October
Leaf Dark-green colored leaves are developed from 5–9 linear-lanceolate or narrow-linear leaflets, 20–40 mm long and 2.5 mm wide. The leaves are digitate and the leaflets are narrower
Flowering season June to August
Flower Flowers are 11–15 mm long, almost sedentary; lower flowers are alternate, upper ones more or less sub-verticilate inside. Floral bracts are small-sized, easily falling. The calyx is bilabiate, profoundly bipartite; the lower lip is longer, entire or irregularly two- or three-toothed. The corolla is blue, violet, or, less frequently, pink and white.
Fruit Shape & Size Oblong, slightly inflated pods that are 35–50 mm long and 7–10 mm wide. They are 4- or 7-seeded, with oblique partitions between seeds
Fruit Color Initially green turning to brown as they mature
Seed Seeds are 4–8 mm long, 3–7 mm wide and 3‒6 mm high, globular, with smooth testa, variously coloured mostly dark gray and brown to white, or speckled or mottled
Season October-November

Plant Description

Blue lupin is an erect, deeply tap rooted, fast growing, robust, much-branched, annual herb that mostly grows about 50 cm or less in height. The plant is found growing in disturbed sites, wastelands, roadsides, sandy coastal habitats, open woodlands, degraded shrub lands, abandoned fields, shrub steppes, parks, gardens, cultivated and rocky ground, secondary forests, ruderal areas, fields, gardens, and harbors, meadows, in bushes and near reservoirs. The plant does well on low to moderately fertile, well-drained, light or medium textured and mildly acidic to neutral sands and sandy loams. It does not withstand waterlogged soils but has tolerance of transient waterlogging. L. angustifolius is able to suppress native plant species by altering soil characteristics through its nitrogen fixing activity, allowing the spread of other non-native species. It is listed as invasive in Australia. The plant has robust and hairy stem, with profuse lateral branching.

Leaves

Dark-green colored leaves are developed from 5–9 linear-lanceolate or narrow-linear leaflets, 20–40 mm long and 2.5 mm wide. The leaves are digitate and the leaflets are narrower (hence the name “narrow-leaf lupin”) than in white lupin. The upper surface is glabrous, and the lower surface is sericeous. Stipules are linear and linear-lanceolate.

Flowers

The inflorescence is dense, almost sedentary, 5–20 cm long, placed on a short floral pedicle. Flowers are 11–15 mm long, almost sedentary; lower flowers are alternate, upper ones more or less sub-verticilate inside. Floral bracts are small-sized, easily falling. The calyx is bilabiate, profoundly bipartite; the lower lip is longer, entire or irregularly two- or three-toothed. The corolla is blue, violet, or, less frequently, pink and white. Flowering normally takes place in between June to August.

Fruits

Fertile flowers are followed by oblong, slightly inflated pods that are 35–50 mm long and 7–10 mm wide. They are 4- or 7-seeded, with oblique partitions between seeds. Seeds are 4–8 mm long, 3–7 mm wide and 3‒6 mm high, globular, with smooth testa, variously colored mostly dark gray and brown to white, or speckled or mottled, with a triangular spot and a stria close to the hilum.

History

Lupinus species have an ancient history in agriculture that can be traced back more than 4000 years. Domestication first occurred in the Mediterranean region, American continent, occurring in southern Europe, northern Africa and western Asia but the breakthrough that established Lupinus species as modern agricultural crops occurred in Europe and Australia. From the 1930s to 1970s, several varieties were developed and cultivated in Australia and Germany, where it is also listed as invasive. It is listed as ‘possibly invasive’ in the Dominican Republic.

Culinary Uses

  • Seed can be consumed after being cooked.
  • It is used as a protein-rich vegetable or savory dish in any of the ways that cooked beans are used; they can also be roasted or ground into a powder.
  • If the seed is bitter this is due to the presence of toxic alkaloids and the seed should be thoroughly leached before being cooked.
  • The seed of low-alkaloid varieties is used in making ‘tempeh’.
  • In France, it was formerly used as a coffee replacer.
  • Lupins are mainly consumed as fermented foods, bread and pasta products, milk products or sprouts.
  • Lupins were consumed by humans, with the majority used as stock feed.

Other Facts

  • A good green manure plant, it produces a good bulk of organic matter and fixes atmospheric nitrogen.
  • It also makes phosphorus in the soil more available to other plants.
  • Plant is used as a green manure or as a grain legume for animal feed or human consumption.
  • Lupins have strong roots that can reduce the compaction of a soil.
  • The whole plant, including the seeds, is widely used as a fodder for livestock, due to its high protein and energy content.
  • Lupin beans are growing in use as a plant-based protein source in the world marketplace.
  • Stems and seed are bitter due the presence of alkaloids.

References:

https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=25937#null

https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxon/taxonomydetail?id=22805

https://pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?LatinName=Lupinus+angustifolius

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/ild-8552

https://keyserver.lucidcentral.org/weeds/data/media/Html/lupinus_angustifolius.htm

https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/LUPAN

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lupinus_angustifolius

https://www.cabidigitallibrary.org/doi/10.1079/cabicompendium.31706

https://grinczech.vurv.cz/gringlobal/taxon/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=22805

https://plants.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=LUAN4

80%
80%
Awesome

Comments

comments

Share.

Comments are closed.

DISCLAIMER

The content and the information in this website are for informational and educational purposes only, not as a medical manual. All readers are urged to consult with a physician before beginning or discontinuing use of any prescription drug or under taking any form of self-treatment. The information given here is designed to help you make informed decisions about your health. It is not intended as a substitute for any treatment that may have been prescribed by your doctor. If you are under treatment for any health problem, you should check with your doctor before trying any home remedies. If you are following any medication, take any herb, mineral, vitamin or other supplement only after consulting with your doctor. If you suspect that you have a medical problem, we urge you to seek competent medical help. The Health Benefits Times writers, publishers, authors, its representatives disclaim liability for any unfavorable effects causing directly or indirectly from articles and materials contained in this website www.healthbenefitstimes.com