Medicare Replacement Card

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Image credit: www.istockphoto.com/portfolio/demaerre

Once you are enrolled in Medicare, you will receive your red, white and blue Medicare ID card, which will contain your Medicare Beneficiary Identifier (MBI), also known as your Medicare number. This card will also show the start date for Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B. Starting in early 2018, Medicare remover Social Security Numbers from Medicare cards, replaced them with a unique number and issued new Medicare identification (ID) cards to protect you against identity theft. Even with the new Medicare cards, it is critical only to share it with health care providers and do your best to make sure you do not lose your card. However, we know accidents happen, and you may at some point lose your Medicare card and need to request a Medicare replacement card.

How to get a replacement Medicare Card

The simplest way to get a replacement Medicare card is to create your personal my Social Security account if you have not already. This is a free and secure account that provides you with personalized information and tools whether you receive social security benefits or not. You can use your My Social Security account to:

If you are enrolled in Medicare

  • Request a replacement Medicare Card

If you are not receiving Social Security Benefits

  • Get personalized retirement benefit estimates
  • Get estimates for spouse’s benefits
  • Get proof that you do not receive benefits
  • Check your application status
  • Get your Social Security Statement

If you are receiving Social Security Benefits

  • Set up or change direct deposit
  • Get a Social Security 1099 (SSA-1099) form
  • Opt-out of mailed notices for those available online
  • Print a benefit verification letter
  • Change your address

You can also get a Medicare replacement card by:

  • Calling 1-800-MEDICARE (633-4227)
  • Ordering or printing a replacement card by logging into your gov account
  • Calling the Railroad Retirement Board at (877) 772-5772 to order a replacement Medicare card If you get Medicare through the Railroad Retirement Board
  • Ordering a replacement Medicare card online If you get Medicare through the Railroad Retirement Board
  • Calling your insurance company if you need a replacement Medicare Advantage ID card if you are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan
  • Calling your insurance company if you need a replacement Part D prescription drug ID card if you are enrolled in a Part D prescription drug plan
  • Calling your insurance company if you need a replacement Medicare Supplement (Medigap) ID card if you are enrolled in a Medicare Supplement plan

Medicare Summary Notice

If you happen to lose your Medicare card, we have provided instructions on how to get a replacement Medicare card. However, if it was lost or stolen, it will be vital for you to ensure that it is not being used by someone other than you. You can do this by reviewing your Medicare Summary Notice (MSN) and watching for services or supplies you did not receive. Every three months, you will receive an MSN  from Medicare which summarizes the Medicare Part A and Part B covered services you have received. The MSN is not a bill.

The MSN shows:

  • All your services and medical supplies that have been billed on your behalf to Medicare during the 3-month period
  • The amount Medicare paid for those services and supplies
  • The maximum amount you may owe the provider for those services and supplies

Below are links to sample Medicare Summary Notices so you can see what they look like. These samples also describe what the information on the MSN means.

Part A Medicare Summary Notice
Part B Medicare Summary Notice
DME Medicare Summary Notice

You will receive your MSN in the mail, but you can also request to get them electronically.

How to sign-up for electronic MSNs

  1. Log into (or create) your secure Medicare account.
  2. Select “Get your Medicare Summary Notices (MSNs) electronically” under the “My messages” section at the top of the account homepage.  
  3. Go to the “My communication preferences” page, where you can select “Yes” under “Change eMSN preference.” 

Suppose you are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage, Part D prescription drug plan, or Medicare Supplement plan. In that case, you may also receive an Explanation Of Benefits (EOB) that describes the services you have received. While they are similar to MSNs, they are different as your benefits provided under Medicare Advantage, Part D prescription drug plan, or Medicare Supplement plan are different than those provided under Original Medicare Part A and Part B.

Like MSNs, EOBs are not bills and will be provided by mail, usually once a month. You can talk to your insurance company or visit their website and request that your EOBs are sent to you electronically in many cases. EOBs can look similar to MSNs, but each insurance company can also have a different format and layout. If you have any questions about what things mean or see services on your EOB that you did not receive, contact your insurance companies customer service department immediately.

Do I Need A Medicare Replacement Card If I Move?

If you move in-state or out of state, you may wonder if you need to request a replacement Medicare card. The answer depends on the type of coverage you have. If you are enrolled in Original Medicare, you do not have to request a new ID card if you move. However, you should contact Medicare and update your address. If you are enrolled in a Medicare Advantage, Part D prescription drug plan, or Medicare Supplement plan, you may need to take action. If the Medicare Advantage, Part D prescription drug plan, or Medicare Supplement plan you are enrolled in is not available in the area you are moving to; you will have to enroll in a new plan that is available in the county your new home is located within. If you are not sure, it is crucial that you contact your insurance company before you move and ask if you will have to enroll in a new plan because of your move.

There are many reasons why you may need to order a replacement Medicare card, and the actions you will need to take to get a new card and ensure that no one else is using your card to obtain services in your name fraudulently can vary according to your situation.

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DISCLAIMER

The content and the information in this website are for informational and educational purposes only, not as a medical manual. All readers are urged to consult with a physician before beginning or discontinuing use of any prescription drug or under taking any form of self-treatment. The information given here is designed to help you make informed decisions about your health. It is not intended as a substitute for any treatment that may have been prescribed by your doctor. If you are under treatment for any health problem, you should check with your doctor before trying any home remedies. If you are following any medication, take any herb, mineral, vitamin or other supplement only after consulting with your doctor. If you suspect that you have a medical problem, we urge you to seek competent medical help. The Health Benefits Times writers, publishers, authors, its representatives disclaim liability for any unfavorable effects causing directly or indirectly from articles and materials contained in this website www.healthbenefitstimes.com