Facts about Sea Blite

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Sea Blite Quick Facts
Name: Sea Blite
Scientific Name: Suaeda maritima
Origin Virginia north into eastern Canada
Colors Reddish-brown or black (Seed)
Shapes Monomorphic, lenticular, 1–2.2 mm diameter (Seed)
Sea Blite scientifically known as Suaede maritima is a species of flowering plant in the family Amaranthaceous. The plant is native to Virginia north into eastern Canada but also two western counties in Florida, a county in the middle of Kentucky, one northern county in Washington, southern Alaska, and Manitoba. Herbaceous seepweed, rich’s seepweed, annual sea-Blite and Seaside Indian Saltwort are some of the popular common names of the plant. This plant resides in aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland habitats. But mainly in salt marshes and sea shores, usually below the high water mark.

Sea Blite has a well-marked taste of salinity, and some notes of earth, being different from all other marine vegetables. It has brilliant performance in warm dishes (eggs, mushrooms), hot dishes (fish and seafood) and possibly pickles. It is gathered from the wild for local use as a food and source of materials. Sea Blite is rich in protein, fiber, vitamin B6, vitamin E and chromium. It is a source of manganese and contains lutein, phenols, flavonoids and tannins.

Sea Blite Facts

Name Sea Blite
Scientific Name Suaeda maritima
Native Virginia north into eastern Canada but also two western counties in Florida, a county in the middle of Kentucky, one northern county in Washington, southern Alaska, and Manitoba
Common Names Sea Blite, Herbaceous seepweed, Rich’s seepweed, Annual Sea-Blite, Seaside Indian Saltwort
Name in Other Languages Afrikaans: Seablite
Albanian: Seablite, minurth
Amharic: Baḥirī (ባሕሪ)
Arabic: Seablite, suayda’ bahria (سويداء بحرية)
Armenian: Tsovap (ծովափ)
Azerbaijani: Seablite
Bengali: Seablite
Bulgarian: Seablite, морска суеда,
Burmese: Painlaal raytanhkwan (ပင်လယ်ရေတံခွန်)
Catalan: Salat maritime, Canyametes
Chinese: Seablite, Luǒ huā jiǎn péng  (裸花鹼蓬)
Croatian: Seablite, primorska jurčica
Czech: Mořský vlk, solnička rozprostřená, Solnička přímořská
Danish: Strandgasefod, seablite, Almindelig strandgåsefod , Strandgåsefod
Dutch: Klein schorrenkruid, zeeblind, Schorrenkruid, Klein schorrekruid
English: Annual sea-blite, Herbaceous seepweed, Sea blite, Common Seablite, Sea blite, White sea-blite, salt goosefoot, Atlantic sea-blite, Herbaceous Seablite
Esperanto: Sidloko
Estonian: Merelinnak, rand-soodahein
Filipino: Seablite
Finnish: Seablite, Pikkukilokki
French: Soude maritime, Sueda maritime, seablite, blanchette, suéda en épis
Georgian: Zghvisp’iri (ზღვისპირი)
German: Indisches Salzkraut, Strandsode, Strand-Sode, Seablite, Strandsalzmelde, Meerstrand-Gänsefüßchen, Schmalzmelde, Sode,
Greek: Thalassopoúli (θαλασσοπούλι)
Guajarati: Sīblā iṭa (સીબ્લાઇટ), Mōraḍa (vanaspati),(મોરડ (વનસ્પતિ)), lano (લાણો), morad (મોરડ), moras (મોરસ)
Hausa: Seablite
Hebrew: Ym  (ים)
Hindi: Alur, seablite
Hungarian: Seablite, heverő sóballa, magyar sóballa       
Icelandic: Sjóblástur, salturt, Salturt, saltjurt
Indonesian: Seablite
Irish: Seablite, blide mhara         
Italian: Seablite, suaeda, suaeda marittima
Japanese: Shīburaito (シーブライト), Hama matsuna (ハママツナ)
Javanese: Segawon
Kannada: Sīblaiṭ (ಸೀಬ್ಲೈಟ್)
Kazakh: Teñiz qabatı (теңіз қабаты)
Korean: Seablite, hae hong na mul  (해홍나물)              
Kurdish: Seablite
Lao: Phun thale (ພື້ນທະເລ)
Latin: Seablite
Latvian: Jūras dzelme, Jūrmalas sveda
Lithuanian: Jūros dugnas, Pajūrinė soduotė
Macedonian: Morska voda (морска вода)
Malagasy: Seablite
Malay: Seablite
Malayalam: Kaṭalttīraṁ (കടൽത്തീരം)
Maltese: Seablite
Marathi: Seebalait (सीबलाइट), moras (मोरस)
Mongolian: Dalain urgamal (далайн ургамал)
Nepali: Siblā iṭa (सिब्लाइट)
Northern Sami: Sálteurttas
Norwegian: Seablite, Saftmelde, Strand-melde
Oriya: ସମୁଦ୍ର, ଗେଡ଼ିଆ gerdia
Pashto: سیبلایټ
Persian: ساحل, سیاه‌شور دریایی
Polish: Seablite, Sodówka nadmorska
Portuguese: Seablite, Valverde-da-praia
Punjabi: Samudarī pāṇī (ਸਮੁੰਦਰੀ ਪਾਣੀ)
Romanian: Seablite
Russian: Seablite, Sveda primorskaya (Сведа приморская)
Scottish Gaelic: Blide mhara
Serbian: Morska trava (морска трава)
Sindhi: سامونڊي ڪناري
Sinhala: Muhudu patla (මුහුදු පත්ල), Umunddi, umiri
Slovene: Primorski slanorad
Slovenian: Morska moka
Spanish: Seablite, almajo, babosa, cañametes, espejuelo, marroquines, matilla, salitrera, sosa blanca, sosa negra,                 Slanorad primorski
Sudanese: Leablite
Swedish: Seablite, Pikkukilokki, Saltört
Tajik: Seablite
Tamil:  Koyey kasseray keeray, Kayey  kaseeray  keray, Yella keeray, Cīplaiṭ (சீப்லைட்), Nila Vumarai,  nir-umari (நீருமரி), Umarikkīrai (உமரிக்கீரை)
Telugu: Kodee kasseray  kura, Kodee kasseery kura, Vellakora, Yella kura, seablite, Alagu
Thai:  Cha khraam (ชะคราม), seablite
Turkish: Seablite
Ukrainian: Morsʹka klitka (морська клітка), sodnyk prostertyy (содник простертий)
Urdu: سمندری غذا
Uzbek: Dengiz sebliti
Vietnamese:  Muoi bien, đá biển, Phì diệp biển
Welsh: Seablite, Gŵydd-Droed Arfor, Helys Unflwydd, Troed yr Ŵydd Arfor
Zulu: Seablite
Plant Growth Habit Robust, perennial, polymorphous, glabrous, much branched, succulent annual herb
Growing Climates Salt marshes and sea shores
Soil On moist, saline, clayey soils near the sea
Plant Size About 20-50 cm in height, reaching out to 2 m in diameter
Stem Prostrate, decumbent, or erect, usually light brown, simple or branched, sometimes slightly woody at base; main branches arising from proximal part of plant
Leaf Simple and arranged alternatively, with one leaf per node along the stem. Their leaves also absorb large amounts of salt and will turn red when oversaturated
Flowering season July to October
Flower Flower can be either radially symmetrical or bilaterally symmetrical. Flowers 1-3 together in axils of upper leaves, each with 5 green triangular sepals, no petals, and 5 pale yellow stamens
Seed Monomorphic, lenticular, 1–2.2 mm diam.; seed-coat reddish-brown or black, reticulate
Propagation By Seed
Season August to October
Other Facts
  • The ashes of the plant provide a soda that is used in making glass and soap.

Plant Description

Sea Blite is a robust, perennial, polymorphous, glabrous, much branched, succulent annual herb that normally grows to 20-50 cm in height, reaching out to 2 m in diameter as an upright or spreading shrub. The plant is found growing on seashores, in saltmarsh, mud, sand, sometimes below tideline. It makes an attractive edible feature bush in a succulent garden, rockery or side garden bed. It is found on moist, saline, clayey soils near the sea. Stem is prostrate, decumbent, or erect, usually light brown, simple or branched, sometimes slightly woody at base; main branches arising from proximal part of plant.

Leaves

Leaves are fleshy, semi-cylindrical, and simple and arranged alternatively, with one leaf per node along the stem. Leaves blades are linear, usually sub-terete, sometimes flat, 10–50 mm long and 0.8–1.7 mm wide, apex blunt to acute. Leaves also absorb large amounts of salt and will turn red when oversaturated.

Flowers

The flower can be either radially symmetrical or bilaterally symmetrical. Flowers are tiny, 1-2 mm in diameter. Flowers occurs 1-3 together in axils of upper leaves, each with 5 green triangular sepals, no petals, and 5 pale yellow stamens. Flowering normally takes place in between July to October.

Seeds

Seeds are monomorphic, lenticular, 1–2.2 mm diameter. Seed-coat is reddish-brown or black and reticulate.

The life cycle of Suaeda maritima is known to be mainly annually. The plant will perform its entire life cycle from seed to flower then back to a seed within a single growing season. All roots, stems and leaves of the Suaeda maritima plant will die and the only thing that can bridge the gap between each generation is a dormant seed.

Culinary Uses

  • Young leaves can be consumed raw or cooked.
  • It has a pleasant salty flavor; they make a nice addition in small quantities to a salad.
  • They are often mixed with other vegetables in order to reduce their saltiness.
  • The young shoots are pickled in vinegar and eaten on their own or used as a relish.
  • Seed can be consumed raw or cooked.
  • Local people in Samut Songkram province use sea blite for different types of cooking such as traditional sea blite salad, sea blite curry with crabs, or scalded sea blite with chili paste.
  • In the South of India, sea blite is pickled in vinegar or used for cooking as well as domestic animal food.

References:

https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=20662#null

https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxon/taxonomydetail?id=486847

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Suaeda+maritima

https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/117385

https://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/bliase57.html

http://luirig.altervista.org/schedenam/fnam.php?taxon=Suaeda+maritima+ssp.+maritima

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-2484020

https://inaturalist.ala.org.au/taxa/169432-Suaeda-maritima

https://indiabiodiversity.org/species/show/266351

https://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Annual%20Sea-Blite.html

https://plants.jstor.org/compilation/Suaeda.maritima

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suaeda_maritima

https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/SUEMA

http://www.naturalmedicinalherbs.net/herbs/s/suaeda-maritima=sea-blite.php

https://plants.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=SUMA

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