Uses and benefits of Marsh Cudweed – Gnaphalium uliginosum

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

Marsh Cudweed Quick Facts
Name: Marsh Cudweed
Scientific Name: Gnaphalium uliginosum
Origin Widespread across much of Europe, Asia, and North America
Shapes Small achenes, nerveless
Taste Bitter, pungent
Health benefits Beneficial for laryngitis, upper respiratory catarrh, tonsillitis, high blood pressure, lung problems, leucorrhea, hemorrhage, sciatica, lumbago, arthritis
Marsh Cudweed scientifically known as Gnaphalium uliginosum is a woolly annual plant belonging to Asteraceae ⁄ Compositae (Aster family) which also include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. The plant is found chiefly west of the Cascades crest in Washington; Alaska to Oregon, east across the northern Rocky Mountains and northern Great Plains to eastern North America. Some of the popular common names of the plant include cudweed, Low cudweed, Marsh cudweed, Mouse-ear, Mud cudweed, brown cudweed and wayside cudweed. The species name uliginosum comes from the Latin uligo (liquid, moisture), the name means that it grows on moist soil.

Marsh Cudweed Facts

Name Marsh Cudweed
Scientific Name Gnaphalium uliginosum
Native Widespread across much of Europe, Asia, and North America
Common Names Cudweed, Low cudweed, Marsh cudweed, Mouse-ear, Mud cudweed, brown cudweed, wayside cudweed
Name in Other Languages Afrikaans: Cudweed
Albanian: Cudweed
Amharic: T’elefe (ጠለፈ)
Arabic: Tahlab (طحلب)
Armenian: Kokord (կոկորդ)
Azerbaijani: Cudweed, Bataqlıq qurucası
Bashkir: Кипкәр
Bengali: Cudweed
Bulgarian: Byal smil (бял смил), blagolyubiv byal smil  (благолюбив бял смил)
Burmese: Cudweed
Catalan: Gnafali uliginós
Chinese: Zhū cǎo (猪草), shī shēng shǔ qū cǎo (湿生鼠麴草)
Croatian: Cudweed
Czech: Pudink, protěž bažinná
Danish: Cudweed, Almindelig Hør, Krans-Lilje, Sump-evighedsblomst, Vild Tulipan, Østrigsk Hør, Sump-evighedsblomst, sumpevigedsblomst
Dutch: Cudweed, Moerasdroogbloem
English: Cudweed, Low cudweed, Marsh cudweed, Mouse-ear, Mud cudweed, brown cudweed, wayside cudweed
Esperanto: Cudweed
Estonian: Kaisukaru, Soo-kassiurb
Filipino: Cudweed
Finnish: Cudweed, Peltopellava, Tiikerililja, Varjolilja, Savijäkkärä
French: Cudweed, Cotonnière des fanges, Gnaphale des fanges, Gnaphale des marais, Gnaphale des mares, Gnaphale des vases, Cotonnière des marais, Gnaphale uligineuse, filaginelle des marais, gnaphale des lieux humides, gnaphale fangeux, gnaphale uligineux, immortelle des marais
Georgian: Sidukhch’ire (სიდუხჭირე)
German: Cudweed, Sumpf-Ruhrkraut, Sumpfruhrkraut
Greek: Ankaliá (αγκαλιά)
Gujarati: Cudweed
Hausa: Cudanya
Hebrew: חרס
Hindi: Cudweed
Hungarian: Gyopár, Iszapgyopár
Icelandic: Hvítlaukur, Grámygla
Indonesian: Cudweed
Irish: Cudweed, Gnamhlus corraigh
Italian: Cudweed, Canapicchia palustre, gnafalio acquatico
Japanese: Kaddou~īdo (カッドウィード), himechichikogusa (ヒメチチコグサ), ezonohahakogusa (エゾノハハコグサ)
Javanese: Cudweed
Kannada: Kaḍvīḍ (ಕಡ್ವೀಡ್)
Kazakh: Qıdır (қыдыр)
Korean: Daegu (대구), wae tteok ssuk (왜떡쑥)
Kurdish: Cudweed
Lao: Cudweed
Latin: Cudweed
Latvian: Cudweed,  dumbrāja zaķpēdiņa
Lithuanian: Pelėda, Pelkinis pūkelis
Macedonian: Bradavica (брадавица)
Malagasy: Cudweed
Malay: Merangkak
Malayalam: Cudweed
Maltese: Cudweed
Marathi: Cudweed
Mongolian: Cudweed
Nepali: Cudweed
Northern Sami: Mohterádná
Norwegian: Cudweed, Krøll-lilje, Lin, Villtulipan, Åkergråurt
Oriya: କଦଳୀ
Pashto: Cudweed
Persian: نوازش
Polish: Cudweed, Szarota błotna
Portuguese: Cudweed, gnafa-cinzenta, gnafa-cinzenta
Punjabi: Cudweed
Romanian: Cudweed
Russian: Sushenitsa (сушеница), Sushenitsa topyanaya (Сушеница топяная)
Serbian: Cudveed (цудвеед), mrki srcopuc (мрки срцопуц)
Sindhi: جذباتي ڪيو
Sinhala: Cudweed
Slovak: Bielolístok barinný
Slovenian: Cudweed, močevna molova roža
Spanish: Cudweed, močevna molova roža, gnaphalium de pantano, siempreviva de cumbres, siemprevivas de las cumbres, yerba de alcaudones, yerba de gorriones
Sudanese: Cudweed
Swedish: Cudweed, Klipplin, Krollilja, Lin, Tigerlilja, Vildtulpan, Savijäkkärä, Sumpnoppa
Tajik: Cudweed
Tamil: Cudweed
Telugu: Cudweed
Thai: Cudweed
Turkish: Cudweed, bozağan
Ukrainian: Sushenitsya (сушениця), Sukhotsvit bahnovyy (Сухоцвіт багновий)
Urdu: Cudweed
Uzbek: Yostiq
Vietnamese: Cây tầm ma
Welsh: Cudweed, Edafeddog y gors
Zulu: Cudweed
Plant Growth Habit Woolly annual
Growing Climates Damp places in sandy fields, heaths, waysides, lake, pond margins, ephemeral pools, damp, arable grasslands, paths, shores, puddles, ditches, small roads, yards, wasteland, meadows, pastures
Plant Size 3-15 cm. tall
Stem Straight or slightly receding, unbranched or usually branched
Leaf Leaves are up to 2 inches long, up to 1/8 inch wide, toothless, covered in white woolly hair, often a bit wavy around the edges, pointed at the tip with no leaf stalk
Flowering season July to August
Flower Very small about 3 to 4 mm long  and crowded in small clusters of 3 to 10, near the ends of the branches and in axils of leaves, whitish to light brownish-green to straw-colored
Fruit Shape & Size Elliptic, glabrous, brown, achene less than 1 mm (0.04 in.) long, tip with unbranched hairs.
Fruit Color Brown
Taste Bitter, pungent
Plant Parts Used Bitter, pungent
Other Facts
  • Yellow and green dyes are obtained from the whole plant.
Precautions
  • It may cause an allergic reaction.
  • Cudweed may cause an allergic reaction in people who are allergic to the Asteraceae or Compositae plant family.

Plant Description

Marsh Cudweed is a woolly annual plant normally growing about 5-20 cm. tall with short roots (5-18 cm). It is covered with tufted white tomentum, especially above, at anthodia. Stalk more or less branchy from the base. The plant is found growing in damp places in sandy fields, heaths, waysides, lake, pond margins, ephemeral pools, damp, arable grasslands, paths, shores, puddles, ditches, small roads, yards, wasteland, meadows, pastures, depressions in cultivated fields, streams, valleys, roadside ditches and grain fields.  

Leaves

Leaves are alternate (1 per node) but numerous and appearing tufted near the tips of branches. Leaves are up to 2 inches long, up to 1/8 inch wide, toothless, covered in white woolly hair, often a bit wavy around the edges, pointed at the tip with no leaf stalk. Stems typically spread out from the base, making it wider than tall, and are also densely covered in woolly hairs, giving them a whitish cast.

Flowers

Flower heads very small about 3 to 4 mm long  and crowded in small clusters of 3 to 10, near the ends of the branches and in axils of leaves, whitish to light brownish-green to straw-colored and look like buds or flowers that have already died back and turned brown, without ray florets; involucral bracts tiny, thin, papery, tan or light brownish. Flowering normally takes place in between July to August.

Fruit

Fertile flowers are followed by small achenes, nerveless. One plant produces 100 to 500 hemicarps; weight of 1000 seeds is 0.007 g.

Traditional uses and benefits of Marsh Cudweed

  • Marsh cudweed is little used in modern herbalism, though it is occasionally taken for its astringent, antiseptic and anti-catarrhal properties.
  • Whole plant is anti-inflammatory, astringent, diaphoretic and diuretic.
  • It may also have aphrodisiac and anti-depressant effects.
  • It is used both internally and externally in the treatment of laryngitis, upper respiratory catarrh and tonsillitis, whilst in Russia it is used in the treatment of high blood pressure.
  • The plant is harvested when it is in flower and is dried for later use.
  • It’s good for constipations and hemorrhoids in the form of therapeutic enema.
  • Cudweed decoction is taken internally for thrombophlebitis.
  • It is used topically for wounds, ulcers and burns.
  • Gargle and mouthwash of cudweed is said to soothe throat irritations.
  • In British herbal medicine, it is occasionally taken for tonsillitis, sore throat, and hoarseness, and for mucus in the throat, nasal passages, and sinuses.
  • An infusion is useful for lung problems, leucorrhea and intestinal problems including hemorrhage.
  • Cold infusion helps expel intestinal worms.
  • Homeopathic tincture is used for sciatica, lumbago and some kinds of arthritis.
  • Fresh juice is used to calm excessive sexual desire.
  • It makes a good fomentation for bruises, wounds and ulcers.
  • Dried flowers are used like hops for a calming herb pillow. As a mouthwash and gargle, the infusion is good for sores in mouth and throat.
  • It is widely used in the treatment of hypertension, thrombophlebitis, phlebothrombosis and ulcers.
  • Decoction and infusion of G. uliginosum are known to possess anti-inflammatory, astringent, and antiseptic properties.
  • Oil extracts are used in the treatment of laryngitis, upper respiratory catarrh and tonsillitis.

References:

https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=502816#null

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Gnaphalium+uliginosum

http://www.floracatalana.net/gnaphalium-uliginosum-l-

https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=GNUL

https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxon/taxonomydetail?id=104248

http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection/taxon.php?Taxon=Gnaphalium%20uliginosum

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnaphalium_uliginosum

https://gringlobal.irri.org/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=104248

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/gcc-32241

http://temperate.theferns.info/plant/Gnaphalium+uliginosum

https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/GNAUL

http://medicinalherbinfo.org/000Herbs2016/1herbs/everlasting/

75%
75%
Awesome

Comments

comments

Share.

Comments are closed.

DISCLAIMER

The content and the information in this website are for informational and educational purposes only, not as a medical manual. All readers are urged to consult with a physician before beginning or discontinuing use of any prescription drug or under taking any form of self-treatment. The information given here is designed to help you make informed decisions about your health. It is not intended as a substitute for any treatment that may have been prescribed by your doctor. If you are under treatment for any health problem, you should check with your doctor before trying any home remedies. If you are taking any medication, do not take any vitamin, mineral, herb, or other supplement without consulting with your doctor. If you suspect that you have a medical problem, we urge you to seek competent medical help. The Health Benefits Times, authors, publisher and its representatives disclaim responsibility for any adverse effects resulting directly or indirectly from information contained in this website www.healthbenefitstimes.com