Facts about Spotted Medick

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

Spotted medick Quick Facts
Name: Spotted medick
Scientific Name: Medicago arabica
Origin Mediterranean region and introduced in North and South America and Australia
Colors Green when young turning to brown as they mature
Shapes Barrel-shaped pod with 3 to 5 spirals, round, 4-8 mm in diameter, the outer margins narrowly keeled, spineless, or with two rows of divergent prickles up to 2.5-3.5 mm long, somewhat curved to nearly straight with short hook at tip
Medicago arabica, commonly known as spotted medick or burclover is a flowering plant in the pea and bean family Fabaceae / Leguminosae. The plant is native to Mediterranean region and introduced in North and South America and Australia. It is found throughout the world, usually on cliff top grasslands and grassy places. The plant is easy to identify because of the dark red blotch on each leaflet. The spot is anthocyanin, the same flavonoid that gives foods such as blueberries their color. But M. arabica is not edible. The plant forms a symbiotic relationship with the bacterium Sinorhizobium medicae, which is capable of nitrogen fixation.

Few of the popular common names of the plant are Spotted bur-clover, Spotted medic, Spotted medick, Spotted-leaf medic, Burclover, Spotted Bur Medick, Spotted Burclover, Southern burr clover, Spotted burrclover, Spotted burr-clover, Calvary Clover and Cogweed. The genus name Medicago is derived from the Greek word medice which is the name of Alfalfa. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) was believed to have been brought to Greece from a city called Medea in the North-African country of Algeria. The species epithet arabica means “Arabian, of Arabia” referring to the plants origin. The common name spotted medick describes the plant’s physical appearance.

Spotted Medick Facts

Name Spotted medick
Scientific Name Medicago arabica
Native Mediterranean region and introduced in North and South America and Australia
Common Names Spotted bur-clover, Spotted medic, Spotted medick, Spotted-leaf medic, Burclover, Spotted Bur Medick, Spotted Burclover, Southern burr clover, Spotted burrclover, Spotted burr-clover, Calvary Clover, Cogweed
Name in Other Languages Albanian: Jonxha me njolla, jonxhë
Arabic: Qisas earabia  (فصة عربية)
Armenian: Arrvuyt arabakan (Առվույտ արաբական)
Bulgarian: Arabska lyutserna (арабска люцерна)
Catalan: Herba de la taca
Chinese:  He ban mu xu (褐斑苜蓿)     
Croatian: Arapska vija   
Czech: Tolice arabská
Danish: Plettet Sneglebælg, Plet-sneglebælg
Dutch: Gevlekte, Gevleker rupsklaver.
English: Spotted bur-clover, Spotted medic, Burclover, Spotted Bur Medick, Spotted Medick, Southern burr clover, Spotted-leaf medic, Calvary clover
Esperanto: Arabia medikago
Estonian: Araabia lutsern
Finnish: Araapian mailanen, Laikkumailanen.
French: Luzerne d’ Arabie, Luzerne tachetée, Luzerne Tachee, Luzerne maculée
Georgian: Ionja (იონჯა)
German: Arabischer Schneckenklee, Gefleckter, arabische Luzerne, gefleckter Schneckenklee, Luzerne, Arabische
Hungarian: Arab lucerna
Italian: Medica maculate, erba-medica araba,
Japanese:  Montsuki umagoyashi, Montsukiumagoyashi (モンツキウマゴヤシ)
Latvian: Ar
Netherlands: Rupsklaver, gevlekte
Norwegian: Flekksnigleskolm, Flekksneglebelg
Occitan: True, treulé
Persian: یونجه عربی
Polish: Lucerna Arabska
Portuguese: Herba-medica, Luzerna-arábica, Alfafa-de-folhas-manchadas, erva-médica, luzerna-da-arábia        
Russian: Liutserna araviiskaia, Lyutzerna Araviiskaya, lyutserna arabskaya (люцерна арабская), lyutserna araviyskaya (люцерна аравийская)
Serbian: Vija (вија), pegava vija (пегава вија)   
Scottish Gaelic: Meidic bhreac
Slovak: Tolica arabská   
Slovenian: Arabska meteljka
Spanish: Carretón, Herba de la taca, Mielga pintada, Trébol carretilla, Trébol de carretilla, Trébol manchado, trébol de manchado, alfalfa Silvestre, medicago de Arabia, caretilla, hualputra, Carretón manchado
Swedish: Fläcklusern
Turkish: Benli yonca       
Ukrainian: Lyutserna arabsʹka (люцерна арабська)
Upper Sorbian: Arabiska šlinčina
Vietnamese: Linh lăng Ả Rập
Welsh: Llys y Meheryn, Maglys Amrywedd, Maglys Brith, Meillion Calfari, Meillion Gragenog
Plant Growth Habit Native, prostrate or sprawling herb
Growing Climates Moist stream banks, grasslands, places, thin pasture, lawns, meadows and fields and disturbed areas including waste lots, roadsides
Soil Light, sandy and gravelly soils, particularly near the coast
Plant Size 2–6 cm
Stem Decumbent or spreading, longitudinally ridged, sparsely hairy, hairs simple and multi­cellular-glandular
Leaf Leaves alternating along the stems are pinnately compound, with 3 leaflets each 0.4-4 cm long and 5–45 mm wide. Margins are toothed towards the tips. Upper surface is hairless, usually with a dark patch near the middle, lower surface is sparsely appressed-hairy
Flowering season April and August
Flower Inflorescence of 1 to 5 pea-like flowers is in a reduced, axillary raceme on a stalk 1-3 cm long on fairly short peduncles arising from the leaf axils. The stalks are shorter than the leaves. Corollas are pea-like, yellow, about 5 mm long, the banner erect, much longer than the wings and keel
Fruit Shape & Size Barrel-shaped pod with 3 to 5 spirals, round, 4-8 mm in diameter, the outer margins narrowly keeled, spineless, or with two rows of divergent prickles up to 2.5-3.5 mm long, somewhat curved to nearly straight with short hook at tip
Fruit Color Green when young turning to brown as they mature
Seed Kidney-shaped, 3 mm long and 1.5–1.8 mm wide, glossy reddish brown, with stalked hilum close to midpoint and adjacent micropyle just outside the hilum
Propagation By Seed

Plant Description

Spotted medick is a native, prostrate or sprawling herb that normally grows about 2–6 cm tall. An annual, it is often found low to the ground mixed in with the grass. The plant is found growing in moist stream banks, grasslands, places, thin pasture, lawns, meadows and fields and disturbed areas including waste lots and roadsides. The plant grows in light, sandy and gravelly soils, particularly near the coast. Stems are decumbent or spreading, longitudinally ridged, sparsely hairy, hairs are simple and multi­cellular-glandular. The plant has one leaf per node along a hairy stem that is often red-streaked.

Leaves

Leaves alternating along the stems are pinnately compound, with 3 leaflets each 0.4-4 cm long and 5–45 mm wide. Margins are toothed towards the tips. Upper surface is hairless, usually with a dark patch near the middle, lower surface is sparsely appressed-hairy, tips squared off or notched with a terminal tooth, stipules strongly toothed and hairy on lower surface.

Flowers

Inflorescence of 1 to 5 pea-like flowers is in a reduced, axillary raceme on a stalk 1-3 cm long on fairly short peduncles arising from the leaf axils. The stalks are shorter than the leaves. Corollas are pea-like, yellow, about 5 mm long, the banner erect, much longer than the wings and keel. Calyces are sparsely white-hairy, 2-3 mm long, the lanceolate, long-pointed teeth slightly longer than the tube. Flowering normally takes place in between April and August.

Fruits

Fertile flowers are followed by pod spirally coiled through 3 to 5 spirals, round, 4-8 mm in diameter, the outer margins narrowly keeled, spineless, or with two rows of divergent prickles up to 2.5-3.5 mm long, somewhat curved to nearly straight with short hook at tip, aging pale brown. Seeds are kidney-shaped, 3 mm long and 1.5–1.8 mm wide, glossy reddish brown, with stalked hilum close to midpoint and adjacent micropyle just outside the hilum.

Other Facts

  • For millennia people have used those plants for soap.
  • They’ve also been used as a fish poison making it easy to catch the fish.
  • A cover crop controls soil erosion and replenishes nutrients.
  • It is planted after the primary cash crop has been harvested.
  • The plant is an excellent green manure and has been the subject of studies about its use as a cover crop in large-scale farming.

References:

https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=503718#null

http://www.hear.org/pier/species/medicago_arabica.htm

https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxon/taxonomydetail?id=23555

https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/MEDAB

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicago_arabica

https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/33024

https://www.feedipedia.org/content/spotted-medick-medicago-arabica

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/ild-8482

https://gobotany.nativeplanttrust.org/species/medicago/arabica/

http://www.worldfloraonline.org/taxon/wfo-0000213417

https://plants.usda.gov/home/plantProfile?symbol=MEAR

80%
80%
Awesome

Comments

comments

Share.

Comments are closed.

DISCLAIMER

The content and the information in this website are for informational and educational purposes only, not as a medical manual. All readers are urged to consult with a physician before beginning or discontinuing use of any prescription drug or under taking any form of self-treatment. The information given here is designed to help you make informed decisions about your health. It is not intended as a substitute for any treatment that may have been prescribed by your doctor. If you are under treatment for any health problem, you should check with your doctor before trying any home remedies. If you are following any medication, take any herb, mineral, vitamin or other supplement only after consulting with your doctor. If you suspect that you have a medical problem, we urge you to seek competent medical help. The Health Benefits Times writers, publishers, authors, its representatives disclaim liability for any unfavorable effects causing directly or indirectly from articles and materials contained in this website www.healthbenefitstimes.com