Traditional uses of Anthemis cotula (Mayweed Chamomile)

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

Mayweed Chamomile Quick Facts
Name: Mayweed Chamomile
Scientific Name: Anthemis cotula
Origin Europe, Turkey, the Eastern Mediterranean, the Caucasus
Colors Straw yellow to brown
Shapes Wedge-shaped achenes tapering to the base approximately 1.0 - 2.3 mm long and 0.8 - 1.0 mm wide
Taste Bitter
Health benefits Beneficial for rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds, fevers, intestinal ailments, insect stings and dysentery
Mayweed or Stinking Chamomile scientifically known as Anthemis cotula is a flowering annual plant belonging to Asteraceae ⁄ Compositae (Aster family) with a noticeable and strong odor. The odor is often considered unpleasant, and it is from this that it gains the common epithet “stinking”. Stinking Chamomile is so-named for its resemblance to the true chamomile plant, Anthemis nobilis.  The plant is native to Europe, Turkey, the Eastern Mediterranean, the Caucasus, Iran, Iraq, North Africa, Ethiopia, South America, Australia and New Zealand. Chamomile, Dog Fennel, Foetid Chamomile, Mayweed, Mayweed Chamomile, Stinking Chamomile, Stinking Mayweed, Stinkweed, Wild Chamomile, Mather, Dog-Finkle, Dog-Daisy, Pig-Sty-Daisy, Chigger-Weed, Johnnyweed and Maroute are some of the popular common names of the plant. The genus name Anthemis, refers to Chamomile and is from the Greek name anthĕmis for that plant. The species cotula means ‘small cup’ in Greek and may refer to the hemispheric shape of the flower head.

Plant Description

Mayweed (Stinking Chamomile) is a more or less branched, usually sub glabrous, foul-smelling annual, bushy, branched herb that normally grows between 12 inches (28 centimeters) to 24 inches (56 centimeters). The plant is found growing in landscape, nurseries, and agricultural crops, roadsides, in meadows, in disturbed areas, cultivated fields, pastures, gardens, lawns and railway lines. It occurs most frequently on fertile clay and clay-loam soils. Favorable soil conditions are rather wet, weakly acidic to alkaline with high nitrogen content. It may also occur on medium-textured soils, particularly if sites are poorly drained, but is usually rare or absent on light soils. The plant has fibrous root system along with a taproot. Stem are 1-3 feet in height, branched from the base (usually) and green in color. The stems are glabrous or pubescent and gland dotted. It has Strong disagreeable smell when crushed and bitter taste

Mayweed Chamomile Facts

Name Mayweed Chamomile
Scientific Name Anthemis cotula
Native Europe, Turkey, the Eastern Mediterranean, the Caucasus, Iran, Iraq, North Africa, Ethiopia, South America, Australia and New Zealand
Common Names Chamomile, dog fennel, foetid chamomile, mayweed, mayweed chamomile, stinking chamomile, stinking mayweed, stinkweed, wild chamomile, mather, dog-finkle, dog-daisy, pig-sty-daisy, chigger-weed, Johnnyweed, maroute, Maruta cotula, Cotula Maruta foetida, Manzanilla loca, wild chamomile, Camomille puante, maithes, maithen, mathor, camomille des chiens, camomille puante, stinkende Hundskamille, camomila-de-cachorro, macéla-fétida, manzanilla hedionda, Dillweed, Dog’s Camomile, Wild Chamomile, Hog’s Fennel, Dog-finkle, Morgan, Maise, Chigger-weed, Balders
Name in Other Languages Afrikaans: Stink-kamile, kamille
Albanian: Maraq, syviç, mayweed
Amharic: Mayweed
Arabic: Aqhawan khamn (أقحوان خمن), sakab ‘abyad (سَكَب أَبْيَض); fus alkilab (فُصّ الكِلاب), qahwan (قَحْوان)
Aragonese: Ruda
Armenian: Ant’em garshahot (անթեմ գարշահոտ), Ant’em shnayin  (Անթեմ շնային), armenian
Asturian: Manzanilla montés
Azerbaijan: Pisiǰ sıġır ҝözü  (Писиј сығыр ҝөзү), mayweed
Bengali: Mayweed
Bulgarian: Plosko podrumiche (Плоско подрумиче), kucheshkata laĭka (кучешката лайка), rada (рада)
Burmese: Kyaway (ကြွေ)
Catalan: Camamilla pudent, camamilla pudenta, guirlanda, segura
Chinese :  Chou gan ju,  Chou chun huang ju (臭春黄菊), Wǔ yuè zá cǎo (五月杂草)
Corsican: Cotula
Croatian: Marundela, Ravan, Smilj, Smrdljivi jarmen,  Smrdući jarmen, prstenak
Czech: Rmen smrdutý, mayweed
Danish :  Stinkende gåseurt, Kamille
Dutch : Stinkende kamille, Mayweed
English: Dog’s fennel, Mayweed, Mayweed chamomile, Stinking chamomile, Stinking mayweed, chamomile, Foetid chamomile, Mayweed dogfennel, Stinkweed, Wild chamomile, wild chamomile, dog chamomile
Esperanto:  Mayweed
Estonian: Haisev karikakar, mairohi
Euskera: Bicheleta
Filipino: May utang na loob
Finnish:  Haisusauramo, saunio
French: Anthémis puant, Anthémis puante, Camomille bâtarde, Camomille des chiens, Camomille puante, Oeil de vache, Camomille maroute, Maroute, Anthémis fétide, Camomille fétide, maroute puante, anthémis cotule, anthémis des chiens, asclépiade
Galician: Finéal madra, herba do hecho
Georgian: Kamania (კამანია), shesadzlebelia (შესაძლებელია)
German :  Hundskamille, Stinkende Hundskamille, Stink-Hundskamille
Greek: Mayweed-ˈmāwēd
Gujarati: Māyavēḍa (માયવેડ)
Hausa: Mayweed
Hebrew: Kachvan mekuppach,  קחוון מקפח; קַחְוָן מְקֻפָּח
High Aragonese: Ruda
Hindi:  Mayweed
Hungarian: Nehézszagú pipitér
Icelandic: Hnotgæsajurt, Mayweed
Indonesian: Semoga
Irish: Finéal madra, Mayweed
Italian: Camomilla fetida, Camomilla mezzana, camomilla cotula, cotula fetida, tribolo
Japanese: Kamitsuremodoki (カミツレモドキ),  Kamome (かもめ)
Javanese: Mayang
Kannada: Mēvīḍ (ಮೇವೀಡ್)
Kazakh:  Mayweed
Korean: Gae kkot a jae bi (개꽃아재비), macho (마초)
Kurdish: Mayweed
Lao: Mayweed
Latvian: Suņu ilzīte, maijvabole
Lithuanian: Šuninis bobramunis, gegužė
Macedonian: Majmun (мајмун)
Majorcan: Camamilla pudenta, camamirla pudenta
Malagasy: Mayweed
Malayalam: Meyvīḍ (മെയ്വീഡ്)
Maltese: Mayweed
Marathi: Meved (मेवेड)
Moldovian: Romanitse kyneluy  (Романицэ кынелуй)
Mongolian: Mayweed-ˈmāˌwēd
Nepali: Mayweed-ˈmāˌwēd
Netherlands: Stinkende kamille
Norwegian:  Tappgåseblom, Mayweed
Occitan: Amaron, Bolèg pudent, Camomiho pudento, Olet, Olhòl
Oriya: Mayweed
Pashto: میویډ
Persian: بابونه بهاری
Polish: Rumian psi, mayweed
Portuguese: Macela-fétida, camomila-de-cachorro, cotula bastarda, marcella fétida, margaça, erva-mijona, fedegosa, funcho-de-burro, macela-fedegosa, erva daninha, erva daninha
Punjabi: Ma īvēḍa (ਮਈਵੇਡ)
Romanian: Romaniță cînelui, romoniţă-puturoasă, romashka nepakhuchaya (ромашка непахучая)
Russian:  Pupavka sobach’ia (Пупавка собачья )
Serbian: žablja trava (жабља трава), ramenak (раменак), maiveed (маивеед)
Sindhi: مايوس ٿي سگھي ٿو
Sinhala: Mayweed-ˈmāˌwēd
Slovak: Ruman smradľavý
Slovenian: Smrdeljika, Smrdljiva pasja kamilica
Spanish :  Camomilla pudenta, manzanillon, camomila fina, cotula fétida, magarza hedionda, magarza pajosa, magarza pobre, manzanilla de burro, manzanilla fétida, manzanilla hedionda, margarita fedionda, margaza, margazuela, matagata, matagatas, ojo de caballo, manzanillón
Sundanese: Mayweed
Swedish:  Kamomillkulla, surkulla, sommarkyndel, baldersbrå
Tajik: Mayweed-ˈmāwēd
Tamil: Mēvīṭ (மேவீட்)
Telugu: Mēvīḍ (మేవీడ్)
Thai: Mayweed-ˈmāwēd
Turkish: Hozan çiçeği, mayweed
Ukrainian: Roman sobachiy (Роман собачий), mayweed
Urdu: میویڈ
Uzbek: Mayweed
Valencian: Camamilla de monte, camamilla pudenta, camamirla de mont
Vietnamese: Rau răm
Welsh: Camri`r cŵn, mayweed
Zulu: Mayweed
Plant Growth Habit More or less branched, usually sub glabrous, foul-smelling annual, bushy, branched herb
Growing Climates Found in landscape, nurseries, agricultural crops, roadsides, in meadows, in disturbed areas, cultivated fields, pastures, gardens, lawns and railway lines
Soil Most frequently on fertile clay and clay-loam soils. Favorable soil conditions are rather wet, weakly acidic to alkaline with high nitrogen content. It may also occur on medium-textured soils, particularly if sites are poorly drained, but is usually rare or absent on light soils
Plant Size Varies from 12 inches (28 centimeters) to 24 inches (56 centimeters)
Root Fibrous root system along with a taproot
Stem 1-3 feet in height, branched from the base (usually) and green in color. The stems are glabrous or pubescent and gland dotted. It has Strong disagreeable smell when crushed and  bitter taste
Leaf Leaf blades are about 0 .75 – 2.5 in. (1.9-6.35 cm) long and 1 in. (2.54 cm) wide. The first leaves are opposite but become alternate as they ascend up the stem
Flowering season July to September
Flower Flower heads are 19 mm in diameter. Each flower head usually has 12 ray flowers. Disk flowers are yellow and numerous
Fruit Shape & Size Wedge-shaped achenes tapering to the base approximately 1.0 – 2.3 mm long and 0.8 – 1.0 mm wide
Fruit Color Straw yellow to brown
Propagation By seed
Flavor/Aroma Noticeable and strong odor
Seed Slightly flattened, ribbed, glandular, and bumpy. They lack pappi
Taste Bitter
Plant Parts Used Flowers, leaves

Leaves

The leaves of the plant sometimes have very fine and soft hairs on the upper surface, although the plant is mostly hairless. There is no leaf stalk; leaves grow immediately from the stems. The first leaves are opposite but become alternate as they ascend up the stem. The leaves are alternate, thick, finely dissected, and pinnate in shape, with many extremely thin lobes, and can be 1.8-3.5 cm long and 2.5 cm wide. Leaves emit an unpleasant odor when crushed.

Flowers

Each stem is topped by a single flower head which is usually around 1 inch (2.5 cm) in diameter. The flower head is encompassed by between 10 and 18 white ray florets with yellow centers (disk florets), each with a three-toothed shape; the florets tend to curve downwards around the edges and may occasionally have pistils, although these do not produce fruit. Beneath the flower proper, oval bracts of the plant form an involucre, with soft hairs on each; further bracts are bristled and sit at right angles to the flowers. Flowering normally takes place from July to September.

Fruits and seeds

Fertile flowers are followed by wedge-shaped achenes (with no pappus) tapering to the base approximately 1.0 – 2.3 mm long and 0.8 – 1.0 mm wide. They are wrinkled, ribbed with ten ridges, and have small glandular bumps across the surface. They are without any bristly or fluffy pappus and are distributed by the wind shaking the stem and by water as the seeds are light enough to float easily. Seeds are ribbed and covered in small protrusions (tubercules) and often gland-dotted. A single flower head may contain 50-75 seeds. The average plant will produce from 600 to 12,000 seeds but plants with 27,000 seeds have been recorded. Large plant can produce up to 960,000 seeds which remain viable in soil for a number of years. The plant spread widely in earlier times as the small seeds were frequently found as an impurity in grass and clover seed.

Traditional uses and benefits of Mayweed Chamomile

  • Mayweed Chamomile is closely related to chamomile, but is far less effective as a medicine.
  • It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus.
  • It is rarely used in contemporary herbal medicine.
  • Whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenogogue and tonic.
  • It is used internally as a tea, which can be made either from the flowers or the whole plant, though the flowers are less unpleasant and so are more commonly used.
  • An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers.
  • Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water.
  • The leaves can also be rubbed onto insect stings.
  • Mayweed Chamomile has been used as a medicinal herb to cure various intestinal ailments.
  • In hysteria it is used in Europe as an antispasmodic and emmenogogue.
  • It is used to induce sleep in asthma.
  • It is believed to be almost as important as opium in dysentery.
  • It has been used as an antispasmodic and to induce menstruation and was traditionally used to treat supposedly hysterical conditions related to the uterus.
  • An infusion is used in the treatment of a variety of complaints such as rheumatism, epilepsy, asthma, colds and fevers.
  • Applied externally, it is used as a poultice on piles or to draw splinters out of the body, and can also be applied to the bath water.

Culinary Uses

  • The herb is used as a flavoring in Peru due to its aromatic property.
  • Herb tea is made from the flowers in a similar way to chamomile tea and it has a similar though weaker effect medicinally.

Other Facts

  • The growing and the dried plant is said to repel mice and fleas, it can also be used as an insecticide.
  • Gold dye is obtained from the whole plant.
  • Plants of average size are capable of producing from 550 to 12,000 seeds.
  • All parts of the plant produce an unpleasant odor when injured.
  • The odor is not very pleasant and so it is not commonly used.

Prevention and Control

Due to the variable regulations around (de)registration of pesticides, your national list of registered pesticides or relevant authority should be consulted to determine which products are legally allowed for use in your country when considering chemical control. Pesticides should always be used in a lawful manner, consistent with the product’s label.

Cultural Control

Cultural control of A. cotula is achieved by methods including improved drainage, crop rotation, using competitive varieties, and delayed spring planting. Improved seed cleaning techniques have lessened the abundance of A. cotula, particularly in cereal grain rotations.

Mechanical Control

As an annual weed, A. cotula is easily controlled by digging, particularly in early growth stages. Mechanical control may be applied pre-plant, pre-emergence, or in-row for effective control. Hand-weeding is also quite effective, but can be extremely laborious with heavy infestations, and the plant may cause irritation.

Chemical Control

Sulfonylurea herbicides effectively control A. cotula. However, biotypes have been identified that are resistant to this group of herbicides. Clopyralid, picloram, and triclopyr provide good control of A. cotula, mainly when applied with growth-regulating herbicides such as dicamba, 2, 4-D, or MCPA. Control is only fair with applications of dicamba, 2, 4-D, or MCPA alone. Control is fair to good with metribuzin and diuron.

Control of A. cotula in forage crops using herbicides was investigated by Smith (1987). Glyphosate and paraquat applied during mid-March after germination of A. cotula and before initiation of growth by forage species provided good weed control with minimal crop damage.

Biological Control

Although certain insects and pathogens are known to attack A. cotula, no biological control programs have been developed.

Integrated Control

Problems caused by A. cotula in crop production are limited to cereal rotations. Crop rotations utilizing varying planting dates and herbicide are effective for control. In pastures and forage production, improving plant competition via inter-seeding or fertilizer application can be effective in control. Eliminating seed introduction via contaminated seed, hay, bedding, or manure is most effective in preventing new or re-infestations of A. cotula.

Precautions

  • Whole plant is penetrated by an acrid juice; touching or ingesting the plant can cause allergies in some people.
  • Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters.
  • This herb is contraindicated for pregnant women or nursing mothers.
  • Anthemis cotula is potentially toxic to dogs, cats, horses, and guinea pigs.
  • Long term use can lead to bleeding tendencies.
  • Foliage may also cause skin irritation.
  • Plant can cause dermatitis, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, other allergic reactions, and death.
  • Whole plant is antispasmodic, astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic, emmenogogue and tonic.
  • Some people are allergic to the plant and this remedy could give them painful blisters.
  • A strong decoction can cause sweating and vomiting.

References:

https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=36330#null

http://www.hear.org/pier/species/anthemis_cotula.htm

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Anthemis+cotula

https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/5672

http://www.floracatalana.net/anthemis-cotula-l-

https://botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/m/maywee26.html

https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=ANCO2

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthemis_cotula

https://accs.uaa.alaska.edu/wp-content/uploads/Anthemis_cotula_BIO_ANCO2.pdf

https://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/subject.html?sub=5106

https://www.inspection.gc.ca/plant-health/seeds/seed-testing-and-grading/seeds-identification/anthemis-cotula/eng/1473681891296/1473681891685

http://floraofalabama.org/Plant.aspx?id=515

https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?103883

https://en.hortipedia.com/Anthemis_cotula

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/gcc-131879

https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/ANTCO

https://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Stinking%20Chamomile.html

76%
76%
Awesome

Comments

comments

Share.

Comments are closed.

DISCLAIMER

The content and the information in this website are for informational and educational purposes only, not as a medical manual. All readers are urged to consult with a physician before beginning or discontinuing use of any prescription drug or under taking any form of self-treatment. The information given here is designed to help you make informed decisions about your health. It is not intended as a substitute for any treatment that may have been prescribed by your doctor. If you are under treatment for any health problem, you should check with your doctor before trying any home remedies. If you are taking any medication, do not take any vitamin, mineral, herb, or other supplement without consulting with your doctor. If you suspect that you have a medical problem, we urge you to seek competent medical help. The Health Benefits Times, authors, publisher and its representatives disclaim responsibility for any adverse effects resulting directly or indirectly from information contained in this website www.healthbenefitstimes.com