Facts about Early Purple Orchid

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Early purple orchid Quick Facts
Name: Early purple orchid
Scientific Name: Orchis mascula
Origin Europe including the British Isles, North-West Africa, the Middle East and western and northern Asia
Shapes Capsule
Taste Sweet
Health benefits Beneficial for treat irritations of the gastro-intestinal canal, inflammation of the Gum and Teeth, cure Erectile Dysfunction and Nightfall. fractured Bones, treat Oligospermia and Oligozoospermia, treats stress and mental disorders
Orchis mascula, the early-purple orchid, early spring orchis, is a species of flowering plant in the orchid family, Orchidaceae. The plant is native to Europe including the British Isles, North-West Africa, the Middle East and western and northern Asia. Early Purple Orchid, salep, blue butcher, clue butcher orchid, male orchid, Salep Orchid, Dead Mans Fingers and Male Orchis are some of the popular common names of the plant.

Plant Description

Early purple orchid is a perennial herbaceous plant that normally grows about 25–40 cm (10–16 in.) tall. The plant is found growing in woodland, copses, and open pastures in base rich soils, meadows, mountain pastures, woods, coppices and hedgerows. The plant can succeeds in most soils, but it prefers a moist loam and lots of leaf mound. It does best in a deep rich soil. The root system consists of two tubers, rounded or ellipsoid. Perennial stems are green at the base and purple on the apex. 3–4 stalk less leaves are present at base like rosette and alternate sheathing leaves on stem. Blades are elliptic–lanceolate–linear, with entire margin; upper surface is dark green–greyish green, without spots–spotted, spots often large.

Early Purple Orchid Facts

Name Early purple orchid
Scientific Name Orchis mascula
Native Europe including the British Isles, North-West Africa, the Middle East and western and northern Asia
Common Names Early Purple Orchid, salep, blue butcher, clue butcher orchid, male orchid, Salep Orchid, Dead Mans Fingers
Name in Other Languages Albanian: Salep
Arabic: Sahalab dhikri (سحلب ذكري)
Azerbaijani: Erkək səhləb
Bokmal: Vårmarihånd
Bulgarian: Mŭzhki salep (мъжки салеп)
Catalan: Botonets de gos, Botons de ca, Botons de gos, Lliri de prat, Orquis mascle, Orquídia mascle, satírion tacat
Corsican: Orchidea maschili
Croatian: Muški kaćun
Czech: Vstavač mužský
Danish: Tyndakset Gøgeurt
De Ch: Männliches Knabenkraut
Dutch: Mannetjesorchis, Mannetjeorchis
English: Early Purple Orchid, salep, blue butcher, clue butcher orchid, male orchid, Salep Orchid, Dead Mans Fingers, Male Orchis
Estonian: Jumalakäpp
Finnish: Miehenkämmekkä
French: Orchis male, Satyrion male, couillon de chien, mâle fou, pain de couleuvre, pentecôte, satirion, satirion male, soupe à vin
German: Männliches Knabenkraut, kleines Knabenkraut, Kuckucksknabenkraut, männliche Orchis, männlicher Harlekin, stattliche Orchis, stattliches Knabenkraut
Greek: Órchis i árrin (Όρχις η άρρην)
Hindi: Salampanja, salab punja root
Hungarian: Füles kosbor
Irish: Magairlín meidhreach
Italian: Orchidea maschio, giglio caprino, orchide maschia
Latvian: Vīru dzegužpuķe
Lithuanian: Vyriškoji gegužraibė, Vyriskoji geguzraibe
Norwegian: Vårmarihand
Persian: Thaealib nar  (ثعلب نر)
Polish: Storczyk męski
Portuguese: Satirião-macho, escroto-canino, pata-de-lobo, salepeira-maior, salepo-maior, satirião-macho
Russian: Yatryshnik muzhskoy (Ятрышник мужской)
Sanskrit:  Salabmisri
Serbian: Salep (Салеп)
Slovak: Vstavač mužský
Slovenian: Stasita kukavica
Spanish: Campanos, cañamón, chupaeros, civiles, clavellina, compañón de perro hembra, compañón de perro macho, compañón, lirios, orchismacho, orquídea macho, orquídea Silvestre, sangre de Cristo, satirón, satírion macho, satírion manchado
Swedish: Sankt Pers nycklar, Sankt pers nycklar, Miehenkämmekkä, Sankt Pers nyckelblomster
Turkish: Er salebi
Ukrainian: Zozulynetsʹ cholovichyy (Зозулинець чоловічий), zozulinieć vańkova (зозулинець ванькова)            
Welsh: Tegeirian coch y gwanwyn
Plant Growth Habit Perennial herbaceous plant
Growing Climates Woodland, copses, open pastures in base rich soils, meadows, mountain pastures, woods, coppices, hedgerows
Soil Succeeds in most soils, but it prefers a moist loam and lots of leaf mould. Requires a deep rich soil
Plant Size 25–40 cm (10–16 in.)
Root Root system consists of two tubers, rounded or ellipsoid
Stem Stems are green at the base and purple on the apex
Leaf 3–4 stalkless leaves at base like rosette and alternate sheathing leaves on stem. Blade elliptic–lanceolate–linear, with entire margin, upper surface dark green–greyish green, without spots–spotted, spots often large
Flowering season Mid-April to mid-June
Flower Flower size is about 2.5 centimeters (1 in) and the color varies from pinkish-purple to purple. The lateral sepals are ovate-lanceolate and erect, the median one, together with the petals, is smaller and cover the gynostegium
Fruit Shape & Size Capsule, that contains tiny like dust seeds
Flavor/Aroma Fairly pleasant odor from a distance, but an unpleasant fur-like smell near
Available Forms Infusion, expressed juice, seeds dried
Plant parts Used Tubers, root
Taste Sweet
Culinary Uses
  • Salep, a fine white to yellowish-white powder that is obtained by drying the tuber and grinding it into a powder. It is said to be very nutritious and is made into a drink or can be added to cereals and used in making bread etc.
Other facts
  • Legend has it that witches administered a drink made from the fresh tubers of Salep Orchid to promote true love and a drink brewed with its withered tubers to cure lovesickness!

Flowers & Fruits

The inflorescence is 7.5–12.5 centimetres (3–5 in) long and it is composed of 6 to 20 flowers gathered in dense cylindrical spikes. The flower size is about 2.5 centimetres (1 in) and the color varies from pinkish-purple to purple. The lateral sepals are ovate-lanceolate and erect, the median one, together with the petals, is smaller and cover the gynostegium. The labellum is three-lobed and convex, with crenulated margins and the basal part clearer and dotted with purple-brown spots. The spur is cylindrical or clavate, horizontal or ascending. The gynostegium is short, with reddish-green anthers. It blooms from mid-April to mid-June. Fertile flowers are followed by capsule that consists of tiny, like dust seeds.

Traditional uses and benefits of Early Purple Orchid

  • It is very nutritive, astringent, expectorant and demulcent.
  • It has been used as a diet of special value for children and convalescents, being boiled with water, flavored and prepared in the same way as arrowroot.
  • Rich in mucilage, it forms a soothing and demulcent jelly that is used in the treatment of irritations of the gastro-intestinal canal.
  • Juice extracted from stem of the plant treats inflammation of the gum and teeth.
  • Juice heals cuts, wounds and ulcers.
  • Root paste of Marsh Orchid is applied as poultice on wounds and cuts.
  • Extract treats Intestinal Disorder.
  • Oil is applied topically on the penile tissue for curing erectile dysfunction and nightfall.
  • Herb is used for treating fractured Bones.
  • It promotes the formation of tissues resulting in increased muscle mass. It increases body weight and promotes strength.
  • Traditionally, it is used to treat low libido, infertility and nightfall in men.
  • It stimulates the physical performance in men. It enhances the stamina, strength and sex drive in men.
  • It increases the flow of blood into the Penis. It also allows longer erection in men.
  • It is also used to treat Oligospermia (low sperm count) and Oligozoospermia (lack of sperm motility).
  • It boosts and maintains the testosterone level in the blood. It increases the sperm count and improves the quality and motility of sperms.
  • It treats gastritis and hyperacidity. Marsh Orchid helps to repairs damaged mucosa of the stomach.
  • As an aphrodisiac, it is beneficial in treating male sexual disorders like erectile dysfunction and impotence.

Ayurvedic Health benefits

Libido Loss Male:  Take 5 tablespoons Withania Somnifera,5 tablespoons Asparagus Racemosus, 1.5 tablespoons Dodder, 2 pinches Saffron, 1 tablespoon Anacyclus Pyrethrum, 1 tablespoon Nutmeg and 1/2 tablespoon Marsh Orchid. Grind all ingredients together. Have half teaspoon with milk daily.

References:

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Orchis+mascula

http://www.floracatalana.net/orchis-mascula-l-l-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orchis_mascula

http://tn-grin.nat.tn/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=25895

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-142857

https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/ORSMA

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