Know about Rose of Sharon

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

Rose of Sharon Quick Facts
Name: Rose of Sharon
Scientific Name: Hibiscus syriacus
Origin Asia including China, Northern India, Japan, Korea and also in Middle East, Europe and North America
Colors Green or brown
Shapes Capsule, globose-cylindrical, about 1.5-2.5 cm across, apex obtuse, abruptly beaked
Taste Bitter, sweet
Health benefits Beneficial for diarrhea, dysentery, abdominal pain, leucorrhoea, dysmenorrhea, dermaphytosis, skin diseases, dizziness and bloody stools
Hibiscus syriacus commonly called rose of Sharon or shrub althea is a species of flowering plant in the mallow family, Malvaceae. The plant is native to south-central and southeast China, but widely introduced elsewhere, including much of Asia. The name of the genus comes from the Latin hibiscum, name utilized by Pliny (23-79) for indicating the Althaea officinalis, in its turn descending from the Greek ibiskos, referred to some Malvaceae. Specific epithet suggests the plant comes from Syria which appears to be false because it is native to eastern Asia. Common names include Rose mallow, Rose of Sharon, Shrub althaea, Shrubby althaea, Syrian hibiscus, Syrian rose, Syrian ketmia, Althea, Blue Hibiscus, Common Hibiscus, Hardy Hibiscus, Korean rose and St Joseph’s rod. It is the national flower of South Korea and is mentioned in the South Korean national anthem.

Rose of Sharon isn’t a rose, but its large, flat blossoms and nectar attract hummingbirds and tiny insects. Native to China and India, they have been cultivated as long as records exist.  Chinese used the flowers and leaves for food. Thomas Jefferson grew them from seed, and was recognized to have planted them at all three of his homes. Flowers on this woody shrub come in several colors, including white, pink, purple, and red. Its leaves don’t come out until late in spring.

Rose of Sharon Facts

Name Rose of Sharon
Scientific Name Hibiscus syriacus
Native Asia including China, Northern India, Japan, Korea and also in Middle East, Europe and North America where it was found before 1600
Common Names Rose mallow, Rose of Sharon, Shrub althaea, Shrubby althaea, Syrian hibiscus, Syrian rose, Syrian ketmia, Althea, Blue Hibiscus, Common Hibiscus, Hardy Hibiscus, Korean rose, St Joseph’s rod
Name in Other Languages Albanian: Hibisk
Arabic: Khatami suriun (خطمي سوري)
Assamese: Swet-joba
Armenian: Baghrjuk (Բաղրջուկ), siriakan vard (սիրիական վարդ), k’etmi (քետմի)
Azerbaijani: Suriya hibiskusu
Basque: Siriako arrosa
Belarusian: Hibiskus siryjski (Гібіскус сірыйскі)
Bulgarian: Dŭrvovidna ruzha (дървовидна ружа)
Chinese:  Mu jin (木槿)
Croatian: Sirijski hibiscus, sirijska sljezolika
Czech: Ibišek syrský
Danish: Havehibiscus, Syrisk Rose
Dutch: Althaeastruik, althaea boompje
English: Rose mallow, Rose of Sharon, Shrub althaea, Shrubby althaea, Syrian hibiscus, Syrian rose, Syrian ketmia, Althea, Blue Hibiscus, Common Hibiscus, Hardy Hibiscus, Korean rose, St Joseph’s rod
Finnish: Sinihibiskus
French: Ketmie des jardins, Mauve de Syrie, Hibiscus, Ketmie, Hibiscus de Syrie, ketmie de Syrie, mauve en arbre
German: Syrischer Rosen-Eibisch, Echter Roseneibisch, Straucheibisch, Eibisch, Rosen, Eibisch, Strauch, Eibisch, Syrischer, Roseneibisch, syrischer Eibisch
Greek: Ivískos o Syriakós (ιβίσκος ο Συριακός)
Hindi: Gurhul
Hungarian: Kerti mályvacserje, törökrózsa
Italian: Dialtea,  Ibisco cinese, Rosa angelica, ibisco arborero, ketmia, ketmia syryjska,
Japanese: Hachisu,  Mokukinka, Mukuge (ムクゲ)
Korean: Moo goong hwa, mugunghwa
Maori (Cook Islands): Kaute vare‘au
Netherland: Althaea boompje
Persian: ختمی سوریه‌ای درختی
Polish: Ketmia syryjska
Portuguese: Hibisco, Hibisco-da-síria, Altéia-arbustiva, Hibisco-colunar, Rosa-de-sharão, rosa-da-síria
Romanian: Zămoșiță de Siria
Russian: Gibiskus siriyskiy (Гибискус сирийский)
Serbian: Oslez (ослез), šamlijan (шамлијан)
Slovak: Ibištek sýrsky    
Spanish: Rosa de Siria
Swedish: Frilandshibiskus,
Thai: Chaba chin, Chba (ชบา)
Turkish: Ağaçhatmi
Uighur: پەرەڭگۈل
Ukrainian: Hibiskus syriysʹkyy (Гібіскус сирійський)
Plant Growth Habit Upright and vase-shaped, hardy deciduous shrub
Growing Climates Sea cliffs, hillsides, along streams, roadsides, also extensively cultivated
Soil Thrives on is a moist, but well-drained, mixture of sand, clay, chalk, and loam, maintaining an alkaline, neutral pH (5.5 – 7.0) level
Plant Size About 8 to 15 feet tall and spreads 4 to 10 feet
Bark Thin light gray bark
Branches Thin and gray, white-lenticeled, with raised leaf scars and small buds
Stem Woody, erect, branchlets densely pubescent with stellate hairs, becoming glabrous ultimately
Leaf Simple, alternate, palmilobed or palmiparted, broadly ovate-deltoid to rhomboid-ovate, about 4-8 cm long and 2-5 cm across, base cuneate 3-5 veined
Flowering season Early July to late October
Flower Bisexual, pedicel slender, stellate pubescent, about 5-15 mm long, epicalyx 6-8, base connate, about 1-2 cm long, calyx 5 lobed, distinctly nerved, campanulate
Fruit Shape & Size Capsule, globose-cylindrical, about 1.5-2.5 cm across, apex obtuse, abruptly beaked, dehiscing loculicidally, with hispid
Fruit Color Green or brown
Seed 2-4 mm long, reniform, glabrous with yellow-white hairs abaxially
Propagation By Seed or by layering or cuttings, cloning the original
Taste Bitter, sweet
Plant Parts Used Bark, leaves, roots, flower and seeds
Season October
Diseases Hibiscus beetle, metallic flea beatle, Slugs Smais

Plant Description

Rose of Sharon is an upright and vase-shaped, hardy deciduous shrub that normally grows about 8 to 15 feet tall and spreads 4 to 10 feet. The plant is found growing in sea cliffs, hillsides, along streams, roadsides, around old home sites, along fence rows, along railroad tracks, and in urban woodlands.  The plant thrives on is a moist, but well-drained, mixture of sand, clay, chalk, and loam, maintaining an alkaline, neutral pH (5.5 – 7.0) level. Stem is woody, erect and have thin light gray bark, branchlets densely pubescent with stellate hairs, becoming glabrous ultimately. Branches are thin and gray, white-lenticeled, with raised leaf scars and small buds. Young twigs have a line of curved hairs running the length of the internodes.

Leaves

Leaves are simple, alternate, palmilobed or palmiparted, broadly ovate-deltoid to rhomboid-ovate, about 4-8 cm long and  2-5 cm across, base cuneate 3-5 veined, midrib usually with obscure nectarines, usually 3 lobed, margins coarsely dentate, apex acute or subacute, with stellate pubescent both above and beneath, ultimately becoming glabrescent, petiole puberulous, about 0.8-2 cm long, stipules subulate-lanceolate, filiform.

Leaf arrangement Alternate
Leaf type Simple
Leaf margin Dentate
Leaf shape Rhomboid, ovate
Leaf venation Palmate, pinnate
Leaf type and persistence Deciduous
Leaf blade length 2 to 4 inches
Leaf color Green
Fall color No color change
Fall characteristic Not showy

Flowers

Flowers are solitary or in small clusters in the axils of the leaves. Each flower has 7-8 linear stellate pubescent bracts. The calyx is bell-shaped and united for about ½ of its length. Each flower has 5 obovate petals that vary in color from white, red, purple, mauve, violet, or blue, or bicolor with a different colored throat, depending upon the cultivar. In many forms the base of the petals are red, forming an eye in the center of the flower. The numerous stamens are united to the style. The plant can bloom continuously from July through September, usually at night. Individual flowers are short-lived, lasting only a day. The 4 in (10 cm) wide, single- or double-flowering, large-petaled, very showy flowers adorn the plant throughout the summer. With maturity, flexible plant stems become weighted under the load of prolific summer flowers, and bend over halfway to the ground.

Flower color Red, pink, white/cream/gray, purple, blue, lavender
Flower characteristics Very showy

Fruit & Seeds

Most modern cultivars are virtually fruitless. The fruits of those that have them are green or brown and are ornamentally unattractive. The fruits are ovoid, pubescent, yellowish, 1.5-2 cm long, capsules, of 1.2 cm of diameter, containing several seeds. They will eventually break over the course of the dormant season and spread their easily germinating seeds around the base of the parent plant, forming colonies with time. These reniform seeds are 2-4 mm long, having a row of long, yellowish-white hairs along the dorsal line. It easily reproduces by seed or by semi-woody cutting at the beginning of summer, if we want to be sure to reproduce a particular variety

Fruit shape Irregular
Fruit length 0.5 to 1 inch
Fruit covering Dry or hard
Fruit color Brown
Fruit characteristics Does not attract wildlife; not showy; fruit/leaves not a litter problem

 

History

Hibiscus syriacus has been grown as a garden shrub in Korea since ancient time.  Its leaves were brewed into an herbal tea and its flowers eaten. Later on it was introduced and grown in the gardens of Europe as early as the 16th century, though as late as 1629 John Parkinson thought it was tender and took great precautions with it, thinking it “would not suffer to be uncovered in the Winter time, or yet abroad in the Garden, but kept in a large pot or tubbe in the house or in a warme cellar, if you would have them to thrive.” By the end of the 17th century, some knew it to be hardy: Gibson, describing Lord Arlington’s London house noted six large earthen pots coddling the “tree hollyhock”, as he called it, “that grows well enough in the ground”. By the 18th century the shrub was common in English gardens and in the North American colonies, known as Althea frutex and “Syrian ketmia”.

Traditional uses and benefits of Rose of Sharon

  • The leaves are diuretic, expectorant and stomachic.
  • Decoction of the flowers is diuretic, ophthalmic and stomachic.
  • It is also used in the treatment of itch and other skin diseases, dizziness and bloody stools accompanied by much gas.
  • Bark consists of several medically active constituents, including mucilage, carotenoids, sesquiterpenes and anthocyanidins.
  • Decoction of the root bark is anti-phlogistic, demulcent, emollient, febrifuge, hemostatic and vermifuge.
  • It is used in the treatment of diarrhea, dysentery, abdominal pain, leucorrhoea, dysmenorrhea and dermaphytosis.
  • Dried bark used to get better from the fever and also could make it to antidote that can heal other internal disease.
  • According to the Korean herbal medicine book, it also can make to brew which can stop bleeding and reduce thirst when you drink it.

Culinary Uses

  • Young leaves can be consumed raw or cooked.
  • A very mild flavor, though slightly on the tough side, they make an acceptable addition to the salad bowl.
  • Tea is made from the leaves or the flowers.
  • Flowers can be consumed raw or cooked.
  • A mild flavor and mucilaginous texture, they are delightful in salads, both for looking at and for eating.
  • Root is edible but very fibrous.

Other Facts

  • A low quality fiber is obtained from the stems.
  • It is used for making cordage and paper.
  • The seed contains about 25% oil.
  • A hair shampoo is made from the leaves.
  • A blue dye is obtained from the flowers.
  • This species is planted as a hedge in S. Europe.
  • It is the national flower of South Korea and is mentioned in the South Korean national anthem.
  • The national anthem gracefully compares Korea to a Hibiscus flower.
  • Hibiscus syriacus is highly tolerant of air pollution, heat, humidity, poor soil and drought.
  • Hibiscus flowers are worn by Tahitian and Hawaiian girls – generally behind the ear. If behind the left ear it signifies they are either married or in a relationship – if behind the right ear then it signifies she is available for the next dance.

Diseases on Rose of Sharon plant

  • If leaf spots are seen, pick off and destroy the infected leaves.
  • If bacterial leaf spot causes problems, pick off and destroy infected leaves.
  • Canker can kill branches or entire plants. Bright, reddish-orange fruiting bodies may appear on the bark. Prune out infected branches.
  • Flowers may be infected with a blight caused by a fungus.
  • Bud drop can be caused by too much or too little water or over fertilization.

Stuffed Rose of Sharon

Ingredients

  • 1 cup cottage cheese
  • 1⁄2 cup plain yogurt
  • 20 rose of sharon fresh edible flowers (petals only, coarsely chopped)
  • herbs, and spices of your choice (optional)

Directions

  1. Process cottage cheese in blender till smooth.
  2. Transfer to nonmetallic bowl.
  3. Stir in yogurt and flower petals. Add herbs and seasonings. You can use chopped green onion, fresh basil, thyme, oregano and rosemary, with a dash of Greek seasoning in mine and loved it!
  4. Pipe or spoon the dip into the center of the flower.
  5. Garnish with chopped petals.
  6. Cover and refrigerate overnight for best flavor.

Cheese Stuffed Rose of Sharon

Ingredients

For Savory

  • 8 Rose of Sharon flowers, pistils and stamens removed
  • 1 cup soft, preferably local, cheese
  • 2 tablespoons minced chives (or field garlic foliage)
  • 1 teaspoon sumac powder
  • ⅛ teaspoon Kosher salt

For Sweet

  • 8 Rose of Sharon flowers, pistils and stamens removed
  • 1 cup soft, preferably local, cheese
  • 4 teaspoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fruit (juneberries, barberries, blueberries, etc.)

Directions

Savory

  1. Combine the cheese, chives, sumac powder, and salt in a bowl. Mix the ingredients with a rubber spatula to blend.
  2. Spoon 1 tablespoon of filling into each Rose of Sharon flower.
  3. Arrange on a wood board or appetizer plate and serve. The above quantities will fill 8 flowers. This recipe is scalable.

Sweet

  1. Put the above ingredients in a blender or food processor and blend until the texture is smooth.
  2. Spoon 1 tablespoon of filling into each Rose of Sharon flower.
  3. Arrange on a dessert plate and serve. The above quantities will fill 8 flowers.

References:

https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=21638#null

http://www.hear.org/pier/species/hibiscus_syriacus.htm

https://pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?latinname=Hibiscus+syriacus

https://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=c522

https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=HISY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hibiscus_syriacus

https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/st295

https://www.cabi.org/isc/datasheet/27131

https://bie.ala.org.au/species/NZOR-6-18331

https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=19094

http://creationwiki.org/Rose_of_Sharon

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-2850597

https://indiabiodiversity.org/species/show/264274

https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/HIBSY

http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Rose%20of%20Sharon.html

77%
77%
Awesome

Comments

comments

Share.

Comments are closed.