Interesting Facts about Yellow Jasmine

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Yellow jasmine Quick Facts
Name: Yellow jasmine
Scientific Name: Jasminum humile
Origin Afghanistan, Assam, China North-Central, China South-Central, East Himalaya, Greece, Iran, Italy, Myanmar, Nepal
Colors Green when young turning to black as they mature
Shapes Berry simple or didymous, globular-ellipsoid, 4-6 mm long, full of crimson juice
Taste Bitter
Health benefits Beneficial for bowels and heart health, ringworm, intestinal problems, chronic sinuses and fistulas
Italian jasmine or Yellow Jasmine scientifically known as Jasminum humile is a much-branched shrub commonly found in the Himalayan region. It is a species of flowering plant in the Oleaceae family and is native to Afghanistan, Assam, China North-Central, China South-Central, East Himalaya, Greece, Iran, Italy, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Sicilia, Tadzhikistan, Tibet, West Himalaya and Yugoslavia. The species is extensively cultivated and supposedly naturalized in Greece, Sicily and the former Yugoslavia. Some of the popular common names of the plant include Italian jasmine, Italian yellow jasmine, yellow Jasmine and Nepal jasmine. The Latin specific epithet humile means “low-growing”.

Plant Description

Yellow jasmine is a small erect much-branched, evergreen to semi-evergreen shrub that normally grows about 2.5–4 m (8–13 ft.) tall and 3 m (10 ft.) wide. The plant is found growing in scrub, dry valleys, in the Himalayas, open forest and margins, coastline, shrub lands, limestone hills, and barren sites. It is a roundish semi-evergreen shrub with thick stems. It has green, angular branches. Leaves are alternate, very variable in size about 2-10 cm long and sometimes revolute. Leaflets 3-7, coriaceous, dark green above, paler beneath, variable in shape, elliptic, ovate, or lanceolate, acute or obtuse, terminal sometimes larger than lateral.

Yellow Jasmine Facts

Name Yellow jasmine
Scientific Name Jasminum humile
Native Afghanistan, Assam, China North-Central, China South-Central, East Himalaya, Greece, Iran, Italy, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Sicilia, Tadzhikistan, Tibet, West Himalaya, Yugoslavia
Common Names Italian jasmine, Italian yellow jasmine, yellow Jasmine, Nepal jasmine
Name in Other Languages Arabic: Geelbosjasmyn, yasimin ‘asfar  (ياسمين أصفر)
Azerbaijani: Аlçаqboy jаsmin
Bengali: Svarnajui , Sbarṇacāmēlī (স্বর্ণচামেলী)
Chinese: Ai tan chun (矮探春)
English: Italian jasmine, Italian yellow jasmine, yellow Jasmine, Nepal jasmine
French: Jasmin jaune
German: Niedriger Jasmin
Hindi: Peeli Chameli (पीली चमेली), Son Chameli, Nepal jasmine, Peela jui , Malto
Hungarian: Alacsony jázmin
Kannada: Hasarumallige
Kumaon: Sonajahi
Malayalam: Ponmallika, jāsmīnaṁ humail (ജാസ്മീനം ഹുമൈൽ)
Nepali: Masino Jaai  (मसिनो जाईफूल), Jaaee (जाई)
Persian: یاسمن پاکوتاه
Portuguese: Jasmim
Sanskrit: Svarnajuthica, Hemapushpika
Spanish: Jazmín de Italia
Tamil: Semmallingai
Telugu
: Pachche adavimalle
Plant Growth Habit Small erect much-branched, evergreen to semi-evergreen shrub
Growing Climates Scrub, dry valleys, in the Himalayas, open forest and margins, coastline, shrub lands, limestone hills, and barren sites
Plant Size About 2.5–4 m (8–13 ft.) tall by 3 m (10 ft.) wide
Leaf Alternate, very variable in size, 2-10 cm long, sometimes revolute; leaflets 3-5(-7), coriaceous, dark green above, paler beneath, variable in shape, elliptic, ovate, or lanceolate, acute or obtuse, terminal sometimes larger than lateral
Flowering season March, April, May, June, July
Flower Terminal corymbose cymes; pedicels 5-15 mm long. Bracts linear, minute. Calyx tube c. 3 mm long, teeth very short. Corolla yellow, tube 1-2.5 cm long, lobes 5, broadly ovate-obtuse or round, reflexed when the flower is open.
Fruit Shape & Size Berry simple or didymous, globular-ellipsoid, 4-6 mm long, black when ripe, full of crimson juice
Fruit Color Green when young turning to black as they mature
Propagation Semi-ripe cuttings
Plant parts used Flower, Leaf, Oil, Root
Taste Bitter
Season September-December
Culinary uses
  • The leaves are used as a condiment.
  • A tea is made from the leaves and bark.

Flower & Fruit

Inflorescences are lax clusters of yellow tubular flowers at the end of branches. Flowers have a slender tube, 1-2 cm long, with 5 rounded spreading petals, about 6 mm. Sepal tube is cup shaped, only 3 mm in size, with tiny triangular sepals. Flowering normally takes place from March to July. Fertile flowers are followed by black colored berries about 8 mm in size, with crimson juice.

Traditional uses and benefits of Yellow Jasmine

  • The juice of the root is used to treat skin diseases such as ringworm.
  • Milky juice from the whole plant is given to destroy the unhealthy lining-walls of chronic fistulas and sinuses in India.
  • Flower is used as an astringent and tonic for bowels and heart.
  • Paste made from the flowers is considered effective in the treatment of intestinal problems.
  • Yellow dye from roots used for ring worms.

Other facts

  • Flowers yield essential oil used in perfumery.
  • It is harvested from the wild for local use as a food, medicine and source of materials.

Precautions

  • The plant is considered highly toxic.
  • Touching the flowers may produce allergic reaction.
  • Excessive doses may cause respiratory depression, giddiness, double vision, death.

References:

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Jasminum+humile

https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=20658

http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=5&taxon_id=200017782

https://gd.eppo.int/taxon/IASHU

http://www.theplantlist.org/tpl1.1/record/kew-351902

http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Yellow%20Jasmine.html

http://en.hortipedia.com/Jasminum_humile

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jasminum_humile

https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/63671/#b

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